The obsession with true crime and serial killers is prevalent, especially amongst women. I mean who doesn’t want to watch Zac Effron portray Ted Bundy as a “smoldering and scheming” murderer and rapist of, at the very least, 30 people?

That is certainly one question you can ask about this topic, but I prefer a different one. Namely, does the recent infatuation with true crime and serial killers promote a more flippant view on violent behaviors and enable future perpetrators?

In Why is true crime bad for society? (published by the Week), Laura Bogart discusses true crime, and the current culture focused on the violence primarily from the perspective of the culprit. She argues that this view on violent crimes leaves people with little sympathy for the victims and their families.

The focus is on the murderer, the rapist, and their methodology; not to mention their unfortunate backstory and what tragic/ sick event or family member from their past caused them to be this way, become this monster. This results in the casual dismissal of the casualties, usually women, minorities, children, the poor, and members of the LGBT+ community.

By glorifying these murders, we, all at once skirt the issues that cause this initial violence (primarily mental health ones) while promoting the disposable nature of our fellow human beings. Bringing these problems into the limelight while not offering solutions or condemning their actions only serves to make these ideas and people popular, wrongfully idolized, and more likely to be emulated.

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Mia
October 19, 2020 8:15 pm

Lisa,
This is a very interesting topic. I am one of the many who are fascinated with true crime and serial killers, especially Ted Bundy. I understand your point about how these movies wrongfully glorifies and idolize serial killers. However, I think they are just showing a different perspective, one from the killers point of view, to people in order to show a more complete picture. When I watch things like this or read about them, I am looking more for the psychological aspect of the killer. I’ve linked below an article that I think explains how I watch and read about true crime and serial killers. I had never thought of true crime movies to be glorifying and I would like to thank you for giving me a different perspective to look at.
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/wicked-deeds/201909/understanding-what-drives-serial-killers

October 10, 2020 1:39 pm

I think this topic is fascinating as a whole, but I love that you highlight the desensitization of death. I think that you could link this to not only our current frenzy over true crime, but the fact that we have been interested in gore for centuries. I mean even Shakespeare was killing off characters for viewer entertainment. You could look at the evolution from the sympathy going towards the victim, to the sympathy being focused on the perpetrator. You could also add some more specific examples of people who have been “glorified” for their terrible actions. Ted Bundy is a great example, but there are so many others as well.

October 9, 2020 3:21 pm

I think this topic is fascinating as a whole, but I love that you highlight the desensitization of death. I think that you could link this to not only our current frenzy over true crime, but the fact that we have been interested in gore for centuries. I mean even Shakespeare was killing off characters for viewer entertainment. You could look at the evolution from the sympathy going towards the victim, to the sympathy being focused on the perpetrator. You could also add some more specific examples of people who have been “glorified” for their terrible actions. Ted Bundy is a great example, but there are so many others as well.

October 9, 2020 3:20 pm

Lisa, I think that this is something really interesting. There is always two sides of any story, no matter who they are, or what they have done wrong. It is really difficult finding someone to place the blame on. While yes, the one why harms innocent people should be locked away, what about their mental health? Clearly this person is not right in the head. Should we then look back at their history and try to rehabilitate them so they can join society again? But then when taking this into consideration, the victims will become upset since this person could have ruined their life, and now they get a chance at life again.

October 2, 2020 5:40 pm

Dear Lisa

To be completely honest, In my opinion Nobody really knows what true crime is because if someone were to do something that is wrong in the eyes of others; yet someone else does the exact same thing, but they are Special ed; then they would be less likely to be in trouble. Yes I believe that it does promote a more flippant view on people who commit crimes because nobody knows who they really are nor their past. People just judge based on one’s actions, not themselves personally. Maybe they have been forced, no options, no where to look, or turn for help. Yes I agree that without a solution what’s gonna stop more crime dealers from being born, and continuing to rid the world of its little peace it holds onto.

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