The Running Shoe Debate: Maximalist vs. Minimalist (Pioneer database research) by Katie

February 27, 2017

 

The Running Shoe Debate: Maximalist vs. Minimalist (Pioneer database research)

 

track and field photoMy research question is, Which running shoe is best for injury prevention: maximal or minimal running shoes?

 

While searching the Pioneer database, I came across a few studies that were very interesting and helpful.  

 

Suzanna Logan, Ian Hunter , J. Ty Hopkins, J. Brent Feland and Allen C. Parcell from BYU University published study that measured the differences in ground reaction forces between regular running shoes, racing flats, and distance spikes .The results concluded that ground reaction forces are significantly increased when running in competitive footwear (such as racing flats or spikes) as compared to regular running shoes. From this conclusion “the data may be used to better inform competitive runners, coaches, and trainers of possible increased risk of injury when determining the frequency and duration of the use of competitive footwear in training.”1

 

The purpose of Jennifer Baltich, Christian Maurer, Benno M. Nigg’s study (Increased Vertical Impact Forces and Altered Running Mechanics with Softer Midsole Shoes) was to quantify the effect of shoe midsole hardness on apparent ankle and knee joint stiffness. Their results showed that the magnitude of the vertical impact peak increased as the shoe midsole hardness decreased with the soft midsole shoe having the largest vertical impact peak. “This study provides experimental evidence that shoe midsole hardness can in fact affect vertical force impact peaks during running. Even more importantly, the results from this study showed that softer midsole shoes can actually increase external vertical force impact peaks. This contradicts the popular belief that softer midsole shoes should reduce impact peaks during running.”2

 

Works Cited:

  1. Logan, Suzanna, et al. “Ground Reaction Force Differences between Running Shoes, Racing Flats, and Distance Spikes in Runners.” Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, vol. 9, no. 1, Mar. 2010, pp. 147-153. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=52007888&site=ehost-live.
  2. Baltich, Jennifer, et al. “Increased Vertical Impact Forces and Altered Running Mechanics with Softer Midsole Shoes.” Plos ONE, vol. 10, no. 4, Apr. 2015, pp. 1-11. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0125196.

https://www.youthvoices.live/the-running-shoe-debate-maximalist-vs-minimalist-part-4-pioneer-database-research/