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June 28, 2022

 

Who’s Responsible?

Anna McCullen thinks that the brands/factories are responsible for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured. In an editorial, McCullen says, “Business must stop just holding up hands to say: ‘It is not our fault – they bought it.’” She wrote this because of how businesses are so quick to blame consumers. For example, businesses are the ones who know what is happening in workplaces.

McCullen also says, “The brands, not the consumers, are the ones who must take responsibility for the endemic problems that this industry faces.” She argues this because the brands are the ones who are cutting corners. McCullen also uses many paragraphs to say how the brands put all the blame on the consumers. All in all, McCullen wants businesses/the brand to take responsibility for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured instead of putting it all on consumers.

I would agree with McCullen that the brand/businesses are responsible for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured. I agree with McCullen because I think that the brand/businesses are responsible. After all, consumers shouldn’t have all the responsibility for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured. I think the brands/businesses can have a bigger effect than consumers could.


Who should we blame for our products not being ethically made?

According to Anna McCullen the businesses and brands are the ones responsible for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured. McCullen writes in an editorial, “It isn’t the responsibility of the consumer to feel guilty about buying what is readily available in shops.” She states this because if businesses would’ve just treated their workers properly they wouldn’t have to think twice about having to buy a simple shirt that was made in Bangladesh.

Brands also have the fault for this because if brands didn’t promote nonethical clothing we wouldn’t have to look closely at the shirt to see if they were made ethically.  Businesses mostly should take the responsibility because if “In a country where a little hand shake and a small exchange of money gets the job done, this process often fails to give an accurate picture of factory conditions, building and fire safety.”

Fast fashion does this to companies driving them crazy just for cheaper prices but doesn’t care if it’s ethically made as long as they have got their money. If brands really cared about giving their consumers a good deal they shouldn’t have to take it too far to the point that they know they might be risking someone’s life.  Businesses know that what they are doing isn’t right and they still continue to do it. If more consumers knew that these “small exchanges” were happening just for Fast fashion clothing and businesses aren’t spending money on the safety of their workers they wouldn’t support the brands promoting such a horrible company.

I agree with McCullen but I also disagree. I believe that it’s the business’s fault for letting fast fashion get to them which resulted in many workers getting hurt. It’s the brand’s fault as well for promoting an industry that doesn’t care about safety and only cares about cheaper prices. The consumer should also take half of the responsibility for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured since we do encourage brands to get more products from industries that don’t make clothes ethically.


Fast Fashion: Who’s Job is it to ensure that products are ethically made?

According to McCullen’s editorial the brands are responsible for ensuring that the products are ethically made. McCullen claims that the responsibility has to fall somewhere and that “the  United Nations guiding principles on business and human rights says that it falls jointly to states and mass corporate businesses…” She states this because she wants to show how it’s clearly the responsibility of the brands to ensure that the worker’s human rights are respected. Like she says, it’s not the consumers but the brands who have to take responsibility for the problems the industry faces.

Another of  McCullen’s claims is   that “In a country where a little hand shake and a small exchange of money gets the job done, this process often fails to give an accurate picture of factory conditions, building and fire safety.” this connects to the assertion that the brands are responsible because its the companies job to make sure that the source of their products, being the factories , are in good and safe conditions for the workers. This is a great evidence to the assertion because she’s basically saying that the consumers really can’t do anything about the working conditions that these people are in , only the brands/companies can do that. Therefore, The brands are responsible for making sure that their products are made ethically.  

Based on what I have read I partially disagree with McCullen. I state this because I do not believe that the the brands are fully at fault for the conditions the workers are in. I think that the consumers also have a bit of responsibility because they are the ones who are always demanding more fast fashion. Consumers are also the one who give more and more power to these companies and most of the time decide not to research if the clothing they are buying are being ethically made. As consumers it is our job to demand that the companies are more transparent about what goes on in the industry.


Fast Fashion: Who is to blame?

According to Anna McCullen the people who are responsible for ensuring our products are ethically manufactured are the states and mass corporate businesses.  In paragraph 15 of an editorial, she states “the United Nations guiding principles on business and human rights says that it falls jointly to states and mass corporate businesses to “protect, respect and remedy” human rights.” The United Nations guiding principles say the states and mass corporate businesses are the ones who are responsible for ensuring our products are ethically made.  The states and corporate businesses are the ones that are responsible because they are a company just like any other and should have the same safety measures because they have the responsibility of their worker’s lives since they work for them. 

In paragraph 17 McCullen writes, “In a country where a little handshake and a small exchange of money gets the job done, this process often fails to give an accurate picture of factory conditions, building, and fire safety.”  These monitor checks are actually not being done either because the people doing it are lazy or because they simply don’t care if the workers are working in safe conditions.  Western brands rely on these people to make sure the factories are being up to date with the manufacturing when in reality the inspectors bribe the workers with a small exchange of money so they won’t actually need to fix anything.  To add everything up the states and corporate businesses are the ones responsible for ensuring our products are ethically manufactured.

I agree with McCullen that it is the states and mass corporate responsibility for ensuring our products are ethically manufactured because every day the workers are getting paid a few cents while the brands are making a lot of income with the products. The workers should at least be guaranteed that they won’t be injured/ killed because the companies wanted to save up a couple of extra bucks and not put safety measures.  The brands should make sure the inspectors are actually doing their jobs, and they should also put emergency exits around the factories.


Businesses should take responsibility for the fashion industry problems.

In an editorial, Anna McMullen asserts that the people who are responsible for ensuring that our products are ethically manufactured should be the companies that make the clothes. McMullen writes: “The story will leave the headlines at the end of this week but on Monday hundreds of thousands of workers will return to factories that are frankly further tragedies waiting to happen, and will keep producing clothes for high street brands.” She writes this because The companies don’t care about their factories until they’re falling. This shows how the companies don’t really shine a light on this topic so it is easily forgotten as soon as it leaves headlines.

McMullen also writes: “In short, the brands, not the consumer, are the ones who must take responsibility for the endemic problems that this industry faces.” She wrote this to show the reader that the consumers are not at fault it’s the brands that don’t take responsibility. This also shows how she thinks it’s the brand’s fault that there are so many problems in the industry. In conclusion, McMullen tells the reader that it is the brands that should fix the industry since they caused so many problems.

I agree with McMullen because I think it is the brands that are causing the problems. I think this because she says, “In short, the brands, not the consumer, are the ones who must take responsibility for the endemic problems that this industry faces.” I agree with this because most problems are caused by the lack of care that these businesses have for their workers and factories. Something else McMullen said that I agreed with was, “In a country where a little handshake and a small exchange of money gets the job done, this process often fails to give an accurate picture of factory conditions, building, and fire safety.” I think this is true because in their country so many people live under the poverty line meaning that they’ll take even a little bribe from companies to not say anything. I agree with McMullen because she made valid points.

https://www.youthvoices.live/tag/fast-fashion/