by

November 28, 2022

 

What if the princess lied? “The Princess and the Pea”

Hi there! Have you ever heard of the tale of “The Princess and the Pea.” If not, then you are missing out on a bunch. Go out to the real world and buy yourself the book and enjoy it. Or you can watch my take on the story as I give you a choice on whether the princess lies to the queen or the princess tells the truth to the queen even though the consequences may be bad. When the Queen asks the princess whether she had a good night’s sleep or not, the princess gives you the ability to respond to the Queen whether she did or she didn’t, you can do this by typing “A” or “B.”

“The Princess and the Pea” was originally written by Hans Christian Andersen, but was later adapted by many people, then I adapted it.The original ending was where the princess spoke the truth, where she told the queen the truth, where the bed was so uncomfortable, she couldn’t sleep at all. The alternate ending was where the princess lied to the queen, where she didn’t want to offend the queen, so she lied and said that it was the comfiest bed she had ever slept on.

This animation started off slow, but as the code got more and more complicated, it took a longer period of time. First, I started off by searching for a fairytale, then came to a consensus that I would do “The Princess and the Pea.” Next, I wrote a script for Act I, Act IIA, and Act IIB. Act I being the beginning, Act IIA being one of the options the viewers decide to make, and Act IIB being the other option the viewer can make. Then, I made storyboards on Act I. Then, I made storyboards Act IIA and Act IIB together. Finally, came the coding on Scratch, which in my opinion was the hardest part.

I could go on and on and tell you all about the animation, but you can simply go watch it.

[iframe src=”https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/221503979/?”]

To watch my animation and to see the script click here:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N96-_VizW94y7tfFjuKwXkKaXj-rFBS7sRsJQtm0Oa8/edit?usp=sharing


Adaptation of “The Devoted Friend”

 

While many fairy tales focus on consequences of a bad moral decision, one named The Devoted Friend by Oscar Wilde shows the consequences of a good moral decision followed by bad actions. It revolves around a florist and miller, which mainly takes place when the florist, Hans, needs money. The miller, Hugh, a friend of Hans’ rises to action and gives him a wheelbarrow for him to use. However, Hugh then somewhat blackmailed Hans and forced him to do chores for him, threatening the wheelbarrow whenever he asks to not do it. Later, when out in bad weather doing a chore for Hugh, Hans dies. During his funeral, Hugh stated that it was a huge loss for him as the wheelbarrow was worth nearly nothing and Hugh could have still made Hans do more work for him. I have created an animation which presents a slightly altered version of the fairy tale, where when Hans asks for money, there is an interactive decision by the viewer.

 

In the alternate version of the original story presented, Hans turns around his fortune in two months time, and Hugh becomes in need of money. Hans, even when remembering what happened when he was in that situation, gave Hugh the money. However, Hugh soon gets into an accident, relying on the money Hans gave him for life support. When he gets well, he throws a party and thanks Hans immensely for his generosity and pays him back the money.

 

To create this animation, I first began with a script to follow during the animation and slightly change in the storyboards. My script had two acts, with the second following the interactive decision and being split into parts A and B. I next created storyboards, which helped summarize each of these acts and showed the general concept. Lastly, I began the animation, following the script as best as I could and added the interactive decision using the “ask” and “answer” blocks.

 

If you would like to see each of these things, they are shown in the following google doc down below:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/12vKcOFuNiHLpmy0KDa2WDfacMegIUjlQENI7Hazx6Yo/edit?usp=sharing


The Children of Hameln (The Pied Piper of Hamelin): Animation by Yours Truly

Hey! Are you bored? Then watch my “wonderful, amazing, spectacular, fabulous, beautiful” animation based off of the hit fairytale, ‘The Children of Hameln’ by the Brothers Grimm, Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm. You won’t regret it. I promise! (DISCLAIMER: NO MONEY BACK GUARANTEED)

The Children of Hameln is a fairytale about keeping your promise. The once peaceful city of Hameln was plagued by rats. The distraught citizens seek out the help of the Pied Piper, a man in bright colored clothing, who promises them the extermination of the rats in exchange for guilders (money). The Piper gets rid of the rats using his fife, which controls the rats and drowns them into the River Weser. The citizens promise, but they never intended to keep it, leaving the Piper exiting in rage. In return the Piper kidnapped the children of Hameln, showing that promises should be kept.

In my animation, the alternative ending includes the citizens keeping their promise, ultimately leading to the protection of the city, as the Piper provided the citizens with a conch shell. The conch shell calls upon him when they are in harm’s way or in trouble.

Through a periods of weeks, I created this animation by creating the concept, writing the script, creating the storyboards and making the final animation. Creating the concept was easy, and I researched about fairytales to find the appropriate one for me to adapt upon. After that was the script and I used the original story to base my script off of. The storyboard was made by taking what I wrote in the script and reflecting it in pictures. And finally making the animation, which is made using Scratch.

Project Submission:
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v2eeZYqV01B_5WpW_jqfPve6QiWCaxeb0-FsSjRw7Z4/edit

^ The link above sends you to my project submission if you want to take a closer look at my script and storyboard mentioned above.


The Bride’s Death-Song

People read fairy tales all the time and usually, they all have a moral learned through a bad decision the main character makes. In “The Bride’s Death-Song,” by Lady Francesca Wilde a story about a girl who has powers to know the weather as long as she doesn’t tell anyone about it. She decided to not tell her betrothed about it even when she knows the weather conditions will be so bad that he will die because of them. She chose a morally bad decision and ended up paying the consequences by dying alone in depression with no one to love, not letting go of what happened. In my scratch animation in addition to the original ending, I display the alternative ending in which she chooses to tell her betrothed and sacrifice her powers for him. She ended up dying happily. This may not seem like a hard process to make this animation, but it was. I made a script, revised it, made storyboards for the first act, one for the original ending and, one for the alternative ending. Including all the dialogue in my script and the actions and backgrounds from the storyboards, I managed to make my animation.

Check it out down below, it’s pretty interesting and entertaining!

If you check out the document below, it shows all my hard work required to make this scratch animation. It included my script with the multiple edits and my storyboards.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kNGZ2UwJ5PRMwhthW3b7WoME8O16NJOInNQ9ILkJSGQ/edit?usp=sharing


Little Red Riding Hood/ The Bear Remixed

Making a scratch animation, is harder than most may imagine. You need to have patience, to sit through all of the technical difficulties that come your way, and be able to fix them. When making my scratch animation, I had an abnormally large amount of obstacles. Firstly, I had no computer for it was broken, proving to be itself a major issue, and creating alternate endings that taught a lesson was also quite difficult.

My animation was based off of “Little Red Riding Hood’, but had a major twist on the plot, while keeping the same lesson, but similar plot as “The Bear”. It took me 3 hours to complete my project, 3 hours of progressive work that is. Once i got the hang of it, the project became easier and quicker to do. I noted that if I laid out all the blocks I would be using, I would save a lot of time by not scrolling around searching for blocks.

In my story, a princess is sought after by a group of criminals. Her father has her locked up in the castle, for her own safety, and she is not allowed to leave the grounds. The nurse in the castle, is also a witch, and offers the princess access to the outside world. The Princess must choose to take the offer, or do the right thing and stay, and learns a valuable lesson either way. “Do not talk to strangers” and “Don’t lie to your parents”.

 

[iframe allowtransparency="true" width="485" height="402" src="//scratch.mit.edu/projects/embed/159036029/?autostart=false" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen]

 

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/193hjUAWbRlmE4iDFhBlaE2B9eDrbdd__0bOQ-te4uFk/edit?usp=sharing


The Fox and The Horse REMIXED

This fairytale describes the consequences of what happens when you are arrogant and don’t ask for help. This message revealed through following a horse who knows he has grown old and must decide to ask a fox friend to help him achieve his goals or not. Whether he does or not is completely up to the viewer. However, do understand that there ae two endings based on such decision.                        

To watch the animation press the link:

I chose to animate this fairytale because not only does it show to not be arrogant, but it reveals that you shouldn’t be afraid to ask for help. It took some time to figure out to make it interactive, but responsive to many answers to the question. The two endings are decided by choosing “yes” or “no”, or any other form of an answer either beginning with “y” or “n” The endings are truly considered the opposite and reveals the consequences of having arrogance. I attempted to portray an important message through a humorous animation.

To see the script I followed press the link:

 


The Crow and the Pitcher Remixed

My Scratch Animation was based on trying to teach lessons about patience. In it, a thirsty crow is looking for water, finds a pitcher, but cannot drink the tiny water that is in it. The crow then gets an idea and is able to successfully get the water to a drinkable height.I present the viewer with 2 choices. 1, the

I present the viewer with 2 choices. 1, the crow would drop pebbles in, and 2, the crow would try to break it open with rocks.

This project took me several hours to finish, mainly due to the crazy amount of actions the crow does to get the water to a drinkable height. I hope you enjoy my animation.

Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jmJro8CUxBpNfvw3QUDo7SRrDArHOfbjcwd_g0iNDRE/edit?usp=sharing

Storyboards:

Scratch Script:

[iframe allowtransparency=”true” width=”485″ height=”402″ src=”//scratch.mit.edu/projects/embed/158255885/?autostart=false” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen]


Little Red Riding Hood (remixed)

Follow Little Red Riding hood on her journey through the woods to her grandmother’s house. She will have to make a life changing decision and you, the viewer, will help her choose. Watch this interactive animation and play around with the possible outcomes… Enjoy!

 

[iframe allowtransparency=”true” width=”485

” height=”402″ src=”//scratch.mit.edu/projects/embed/134561155/?autostart=false” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen]

 

Process:

Creating this animation took some time planning. I first read through many fairytales and determined which one had the most clear moral decision. Little Red Riding hood by Charles Perrault stood out for this project.

Next I wrote out a script for the animation. Here is a link to my script:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tXM83KS0BTTHLfD-_VUCLfP2NIjn7srrNn3NOstChOM/edit?usp=sharing

After, I created storyboards for each different scene. This helps create a visual of the final product.

Next, I created a plan for the making of the animation. This is where I could plan out what days I would dedicate time to bringing the visual to life.

Finally, I created the animation using scratch. This program allows us to use building blocks to animate and program our story.  This also helped us make the animation interactive so that the viewer’s opinion affects the outcome of the animation.

Once the project was completeed, I shared it with classmates in hope of everyone learning a valuable life long lesson…Enjoy!


Blue Beard Remixed

I took Charles Perrault’s original fairytale “Blue Beard”, summarized it into a comic, and then made it into an animation. The story Blue Beard is about a man with a blue beard who has a terrible past with his other wives and has trouble finding a new one. H eventually finds a new wife, but it is up to you to help the wife discover Blue Beard’s deepest secret or not. This animation is an interactive animation, letting the person watching make the big decision that effects the outcome. I went through a process of reading the whole story a couple of times, writing the script  for this, making a comic based on the script on Storyboardthat.com, and finally making a animation in Scratch. Everything is linked down below. Enjoy!

[iframe allowtransparency=”true” width=”485″ height=”402″ src=”//scratch.mit.edu/projects/embed/134684712/?autostart=false” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen]

I went through a process of reading the whole story a couple of times. Then I summarized the story in the form of a script. I will have the script linked here also. To see how everything would look visually, I made a comic in Storyboardthat.com, which are also shown here.  After I was satisfied with how it looked, I started making the animation in Scratch. After a couple days of revising and hard work I came up with my result.

https://docs.google.com/a/bsge.org/document/d/1AiFJ6akApvU8pNN99XrIcALm4iRtOYkTrSNkuXjtUOc/edit?usp=sharing

 

https://www.youthvoices.live/tag/fairytale/