The state of traffic in Atlanta has been driven by decades of racism and attempts at segregation from the white population. While this may seem like some kind of over exaggeration, can assure you that this statement is anything but. The original reason for this was that during the era of slavery, white slave owners wanted to keep those whom they kept enslaved under the microscope to prevent slave insurrections or escapes. Once the civil war ended and slavery was completely outlawed nationally, the white population who no longer had slaves to keep their eyes on now wanted nothing to do with their now freed black counterparts and actively wanted them as far away from white society as possible.

Of the ways white society separated themselves from the black population, the most infamous example would come in the form of the first Jim Crow laws claiming that black people could be segregated from the white people as much as possible, coining the phrase “Separate but equal”. Another major method that was used to keep blacks and whites seperated was seen in the form of redlining, where black people would be relegated to specific parts of the towns and cities, often in the poorest areas that would purposely be neglected by the local government. The act of redlining would also be used to determine what new structures would be built/ destroyed in urban planning/ development projects, like tearing down the homes of poor black people in Atlanta and constructing a new highway in its place, but they can also make it so that is works as efficiently as it can so they can keep the people using that road (who are usually marginalized groups) locked in that area, or at least make it as inconvenient as possible for them to get through that area. 

In my opinion, there isn’t really any other conclusion that can be made. This conclusion is that overall, I believe that the overcrowding of the highways in Atlanta, Georgia is a result of purposely bad urban design fueled by the views of the white minority who wanted to be as far away from areas populated by marginalized groups as possible. It is an issue faced by many old cities that fundamentally affect the people who live in them on a daily basis, and shows no signs of being fixed.

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April 5, 2024 3:02 am

The tone in this passage is very powerful. I like how you kept connecting back to one main idea. I think the photo does a really good job to capture the emotion of the passage.

Qaydu
April 3, 2024 3:07 pm

What first drew me to this post was its colorful picture as it reminded me of a political comic strip. I’m confused about what you meant by the “white minority” because aren’t they the majority population? However I liked how you emphasized that there was intentionally bad urban design that marginalized communities.

Qaydu
April 3, 2024 3:06 pm

What first drew me to this post was its colorful picture as it reminded me of a political comic strip. I’m confused about what you meant by the “white minority” because aren’t they the majority population? However I liked how you emphasized that there was intentionally bad urban design that marginalized communities.

Amora
April 3, 2024 2:59 pm

The writing is very engaging and powerful, effectively arguing that decades of racism and segregation have played a significant role in shaping the state of traffic in Atlanta. The use of specific examples such as Jim Crow laws and redlining strengthens the argument and provides a clear picture of the situation. However, the writing could benefit from a more balanced tone, as the current tone is quite critical and might not appeal to all readers. Additionally, further evidence and research could be added to support the argument and make it even more persuasive.

Kennedy
April 3, 2024 2:55 pm

The paragraph effectively links historical racism to Atlanta’s traffic issues, showcasing systemic biases in urban planning. It effectively uses examples like redlining and highway construction to illustrate ongoing discrimination. Overall, I think it skillfully combines historical analysis with contemporary urban challenges, enhancing understanding of Atlanta’s traffic problems. And I think you did a good job explaining the issues and providing examples to back it up.

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