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June 25, 2022

 

Michael’s monologue (act 1 scene 7)


We Control Macbeth

Act 4, Scene 1, Lines 22 – 34

I picked this passage because is more intriguing because the Macbeth story revolves around the witches.The witches are meaningful to the story because they are the catalyst that causes  Macbeth to have so many conflicts.

In this monologue the speaker is the third witch.She is speaking to the first and second witches.All three witches are on stage and the witches are listening  to each other.They are outside and there’s thunder and rain.The witches circle a cauldron.The witches are a coven.The scene is happening at night time.

In this scene Macbeth approaches the witches to learn how to stay as king forever.Macbeth is nervous because at this point in the story he has already killed Duncan and banquo, but Fleance is still alive.

The central conflict is that Macbeth wanted to be king but he did not want to be the killer of Duncan.Now that he killed Duncan he feels guilty and scared he was also panicking.Macbeth also sees things that aren’t there like Banquo and a knife.He also goes back to the witches to ask them how can he stay king forever.

The third witch is not a dynamic character because nothing happens that changes her personality.Macbeth is the character that keeps changing his personality throughout the story.The fundamental needs of the third witch are all the items she needs is the cauldron.

So what’s basically happening is she’s putting a lot of items in a big bowl to make a witch spell.


A Figment of His Imagination

I picked Act 2, Scene 1, Lines 44-66 & 75-77 from Macbeth because it shows off Macbeth’s hysteria. The scene is at the end of the play, the cause of his death. It shows how he so badly didn’t want to blame himself for the murders he committed, so he instead blames his actions on fate. He acts as if he has gotten it all figured out, as if he had cracked the code, had been given a sign that murder was his destiny. But in reality he was experiencing delusions for all the wrong reasons, guilt.

At first Banquo is talking to his son Fleance about the night. He is feeling pretty on edge because of the result Macbeth had when the weird sisters prophecy came true. He is scared of the Witches, and he makes that pretty clear with the way he is handling Fleance in this scene. Macbeth, Banquo’s best friend, but also new King, enters with a Servant and torch. This approach from the dark startles Banquo because he thinks Macbeth could be the Witches. Macbeth and Banquo converse, mostly about Macbeth’s King status. It is nighttime. Macbeth has just became king, later on he will send murderers to kill Banquo. Macbeth no longer has people around him to distract him from his intrusive thoughts. Macbeth starts to hallucinate a dagger. Currently the conflict is Macbeth’s Hallucination of a dagger. At first he is confused, but then he starts to convince himself that he is envisioning the dagger for a reason, because it is a sign of fate, a sign that he is going on the right path. A path he must continue to follow, the path of a murderer. But he is probably just trying to reassure himself he didn’t commit an ungodly, sinful thing. 

Macbeth is a dynamic character. At first, Macbeth is a loyal nobleman. He turns into a killer. the Witches and Lady Macbeth give him a big head. They pressure him to kill Duncan until he succumbs and changes forever. Then he becomes a manic killer who constantly is fighting his morality. He depends on the witches and his wife or his world would fall apart. They are the only things that gave his new life and mentality meaning. They reassure him that he is doing the right thing. His thinks that running over everyone is meant to be. The words “proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain” reveal that he knows he is damaged by what he did, he knows that he is not ok with himself. Macbeth would be staring at one spot on the ground, he would swipe and paw at the dagger, yet it would not meet his clutch. (he realizes that the dagger is a figment of his imagination)To start his soliloquy he would look up and rise from his knees. (This is the start of his realization) He takes out his dagger and grins, then he looks back at the hallucinated dagger and continues his soliloquy. Then he walks off the stage proudly.(he has reassured himself he is on the right path, and that the dagger was a sign)

The Poetic elements of the soliloquy is the comparison of real life to hallucinations. The theme is really just what the dagger means, why did Macbeth hallucinate the dagger, does it have a correlation to Macbeth’s life. Macbeth makes that connection himself at the end of the soliloquy. Phrases like “to feeling as to sight” and “I have thee not yet I see thee still” show off Shakespeare’s ways of implementing poetry into Macbeth.

At first, Macbeth’s tone is Confused.  This tone is created by the worry and shrill of his voice as it gets faster because he is so overwhelmed. It changes to entranced, though, in the next line, where his eyes widen and his voice becomes slow and somewhat quiet, he starts to breath heavier. Tonal shifts continue to happen. In the next stanza he becomes confused again, his eyebrows furrow and concern starts to creep into his voice, but this time his voice isn’t particularly loud or soft it is at a fixed level of volume.  In the next line Macbeth is in disbelief, he doubts his vision, his voice is shrill and frustrated, his eyebrows are kept raised throughout this line. In the next line Macbeth is focused, his voice now can barely be heard he is contemplating endlessly. His face is bleak. In the next stanza he again, in awe of this dagger, he shakes himself out of his state of focus and begins to paw at the dagger, his mouth is wide open. In the next line Macbeth accepts that his brain isn’t doing great and he realizes that may be the reason why he is envisioning the dagger. His face is now bleak, maybe a bit sorrowful even, his voice is dull, his brows eventually start to furrow once he realizes that his brain hadn’t reacted well to the murder. In the next line Macbeth convinces himself that he was going good. He shakes his head, dismissing his previous thoughts and he speaks confidently, loud and proud, in fact he smiles. In the next line he is even more confident, he speaks loudly, grins smugly, he’s Macbeth, he has a purpose and has been given a sign from god. In the last line is satisfied that he came to that conclusion. He smiles his words are loud and clear, he doesn’t have to worry about his “heat oppressed brain”. What nonsense! he decides.


Macbeth Fears Nothing

For my monologue project, I selected lines from one of the most thought-provoking scenes from Shakespeare’s play, “Macbeth.” I chose to learn Act 5, Scene 5, lines 9 -17 as my monologue since I think it is one of the most unique monologues regarding Macbeth going through so much that he has forgotten what fear feels like

The monologue consists of Macbeth speaking to Seyton about what he is not feeling that he feels like he should be feeling.This monologue is heard by Seyton The monologue takes place in Dunsinane where, after…Seyton and Macbeth hear a “Cry of women”, it makes Macbeth feel unphased

The main conflict in this scene would most likely be Macbeth ordering that banners be hung and boasts that his castle will repel the enemy, I say this because of the prophecy that “Macbeth shall never vanquished be, until Great Birnam wood to high Dunsinane hill Shall come against him.”.Macbeth starts to feel sort of disgusted for what he has done. This is part of a pattern for Macbeth where he’s doing all these murders. Over time this builds up to be a main conflict in the story of Macbeth

In the scene where this monologue occurs, Macbeth is quite a Foolish character. This is especially true after He realizes what he has done has affected him . Macbeth becomes Anxious and Hopeless. This seems consistent with his previous state of mind earlier in the play. 

In the monologue, words like “Direness”, as well as the word choice in the sentence “Cannot once start me.” reflect that Macbeth is committed to avoiding and fearing the prophecy that will lead to his death. The words “I have supped full with horrors.” represents the feeling of gloominess that Macbeth is experiencing after committing murders contributing to his overall Psychological and Emotional state

If it was up to me to stage this scene, I would most likely make the actors playing Macbeth and Seyton stand in a castle in order to set the mood of Suspense. This might represent Macbeth‘s feelings of fearlessness after he realizes that everything that he has done has led up to this point . I would also add some props to the scene, for Macbeth to perhaps stand while holding it downward in order to show braveness after he heard the cry of Lady Macbeth dying. If I were to direct the actors, then I would most likely encourage Seytonto be a bit uneasy, and give off a feeling of being concerned in an effort to make his character believable.

In this monologue, Shakespeare used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. As I mentioned before, the main theme in this scene would be the Fearlessness you feel after experiencing so much trauma and the use of poetic elements really reinforces the impact of Macbeth‘s emotions. For example, Shakespeare used Diction as a feature in his writing to provide sorrow, as well as despair 

All in all, the monologue in Act 5, Scene 5 is a prime example of an effective piece of writing by Shakespeare that shows how one can be affected or changed by their actions to the point were they become a whole different person.


Lady Macbeth’s Deviant Side

I picked Act 1, Scene #5 Lines 16-33 first off  because I find Lady Macbeth to be a complex character. This passage takes place right after she received the letter from her husband, Macbeth, talking about how he met the witches and all the prophecies. Lady Macbeth is expressing how she feels that Macbeth will not be brave enough to go through with killing King Duncan. This is kind of relatable to me, and that’s why I chose it, because I often feel like people talk a lot about doing things but never go through with any of it and that is clearly what Lady Macbeth is feeling here about Macbeth.

In this monologue, Lady Macbeth is speaking to herself, well she is speaking to the letter Macbeth gave her, but no one else is in the room. She is sitting in her bedroom when she recieves 

The letter which leads me to assume that she stays in her room to read the letter. I believe it is in the morning just after she woke up. This is right smack in the middle of the rising action in the play, it is just after Macbeth won the war between Scotland and Norway. This is where the real issue in the story or rather that central conflict is introduced because it sets off everything in the play.

The main conflict in this scene is, Lady Macbeth is pondering Macbeth’s decision to listen to the witches prophecies and kill King Duncan. She is wondering if he will really go through with the deed. I say this because Lady Macbeth is doubting about her husband’s courage. She starts to feel fear for what Macbeth is saying. She is saying that he isn’t a coward but he isn’t evil enough to go kill Duncan. This is sort of where Lady Macbeth’s deviant side comes out because due to her lack of courage in Macbeth, she is realizing what she has to do. Later on you see this come into play because she tries to manipulate Macbeth into going through with it until she drives herself insane too.

I think the way I would stage this play is Lady Macbeth would be sitting in her bed reading and such when the messenger comes in to give her the letter, she would get up quickly and abruptly when the messenger enters. After she is given the letter, the messenger would exit the room because Lady Macbeth must be alone in this scene. She would sit at her desk and open the letter and begin reading. As she gets deeper into the letter I would want her to start pacing around the room to show how surprised she is by the contents of the letter. When she begins her monologue she is leaning against her room door but then begins pacing again. I would do this because I feel that it reflects how she is taking in big pieces of information and processing them by walking and pacing around her room.

In this monologue, Shakespere used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. As I mentioned before, the main theme in this scene would be Lady Macbeth’s questioning of her husband, Macbeth’s bravery and the use of poetic elements really reinforces the impact of Lady Macbeth‘s emotions. For example, Shakespere used sound effects in this monologue. For example, he used strong sounds the emphasize Lady Macbeth’s emotions and her strong sense of doubt. She uses a lot of opposing sentences in her monologue like, “Wouldst not play false and yet wouldst wrongly win…”. The word ‘wouldst’ is used here for emphasis on her emotions and to show the theme of Lady Macbeth’s doubts.

All in all, the monologue in Act 1, Scene 5 is a prime example of an effective piece of writing by Shakespeare that shows character development in Lady Macbeth, you see her deviance rise and watch her realize how cynical she needs to be.


Macbeth’s Vulnerability

For my monologue project, I selected lines from a monologue that shows Macbeth at his most vulnerable from Shakespeare’s play,”Macbeth” I chose to learn Act 5, Scene 5, lines 20-31 as my monologue because it shows how Macbeth reacts to the death of his wife.

The monologue consists of Macbeth, and Seyton, in this monologue Macbeth is speaking to himself after being informed that his wife is dead. He is monologuing about what is plaguing him. This monologue is heard by Seyton. The monologue takes place in Macbeth’s castle where, Duncan used to reside, this makes Macbeth feel pride.

The main conflict in this scene would most likely be Macbeth grappling with the idea of death. I say this because of the amount of metaphors he gives for death. Macbeth starts to feel hopeless for what he has done. This is part of a pattern for Macbeth where after he goes through with something he regrets it.Over time this builds up to be a main conflict in the story of Macbeth.

In the scene where this monologue occurs, Macbeth is quite a gloomy character. This is especially true after he kills duncan. Macbeth becomes foolish and unattentive. This seems contradictory to his previous state of mind earlier in the play. 

In the monologue, words like “Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, And then is heard no more, as well as the word choice in the sentence “It is a tale Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing.”reflect that Macbeth is committed to obsessing over the concept of death.i believe that throughout the play they avoid using terms because it upsets him . The words “And all our yesterdays have lighted foolsThe way to dusty death.” represents the feeling of being lost that Macbeth is experiencing after lady Macbeth died, contributing to his overall broken state of being.

If it was up to me to stage this scene, I would most likely make the actors playing Macbeth pace back and forth in a castle in order to set the mood of loss. This might represent Macbeth‘s feelings of sadness after he realizes that lady Macbeth is dead. I would also add some props to the scene, for Macbeth to perhaps grab onto something when he hears the news in order to show a hopeless state of mind. If I were to direct the actors, then I would most likely encourage Macbeth to be a bit lethargic, and give off a feeling of being depressed in an effort to make his character believable.

In this monologue, Shakespeare used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. As I mentioned before, the main theme in this scene would be Macbeth grappling with the idea of death and the use of poetic elements really reinforces the impact of Macbeth‘s emotions. For example, Shakespeare used iambic pentameter as a feature in his writing to provide tension in the scenes, as well as allusion to give the play an enigmatic feel.

All in all, the monologue in Act 5, Scene 5 is a prime example of an effective piece of writing by William Shakespeare that gives some insight on how his characters act when alone.


I can’t kill the king

 I picked this Act 1 Scene 7 because it seem interesting. I liked the actor because the way she talks to Macbeth like if she were her mother. These lines clearly show the way that Lady Macbeth treats Macbeth. To me this Scene tells me the way that Lady Macbeth treats Macbeth. Lady Macbeth is saying all these things for Macbeth could be ashamed of himself because Macbeth is basically saying, I can’t kill the King. 

         Lady Macbeth is talking about Macbeth. They are the only ones there because only Lady Macbeth and him know about the plan. Lady Macbeth and Macbeth were at the Royal Palace when Lady Macbeth is bringing him down. Lady Macbeth is calling him names to see if he gets his desire of being a king back. She mentioning him their love too. 

     The way Lady Macbeth talks to Macbeth is like she is in love with him but hates him because she really wants to become a Queen. When she uses the words “From this time is What I think about your love”. Changes the way I thought of her because she is using their love to make him want to become king again.

       I would act out this scene with love and hatred. Lady Macbeth is still in love with Macbeth but she really wants to become Queen. You need to show emotion. Lady Macbeth shows Macbeth that she really wants to be queen.

     Shakespeare expresses the theme of the poem by the Lady Macbeth speaks to Macbeth. The words that she is saying are supposed to make him change his mind. Lady Macbeth says something stronger and stronger every line. This shows that she is thirsty to become queen. She really desires to become king. 


The sorrow of Macbeth

Act 5, Scene 5, Lines 20-31

For my monologue project, I selected lines from one of the saddest scenes from Shakespeare’s play, “The Tragedy of Macbeth”. I chose to learn Act 5, Scene 5, lines 20-31 as my monologue since I think it is one of the most sorrowful monologues regarding that lady Macbeth dies and Macbeth receives the message.

The monologue consists of Macbeth and Seyton, Seyton is speaking to Macbeth about lady Macbeth’s death. Seyton says, “The Queen, my lord, is dead”(line 19). This monologue is heard by Macbeth. Seyton tells Macbeth in private only both of them are speaking and there isn’t anyone there who is overhearing things. The monologue takes place in Macbeth’s castle where Macbeth lives and where the king sits after Lady Macbeth manipulated Macbeth to kill Duncan to be able to live in this castle and made lady Macbeth feel guilty of what she made Macbeth do. The main conflict in this scene would most likely be Macbeth reacting to the death of lady Macbeth and receiving the news. I say this because of how Macbeth reacts he says, “She should have died hereafter;”(line 20) like saying that she shouldn’t have died there but over here. Macbeth at the beginning was weak and not “manly” but throughout the story, he became tougher and is able to make his own decisions. Macbeth starts to feel sorrow for what lady Macbeth has done. This is part of a pattern for Macbeth where starts to lose everything he has loved and had. Over time this builds up to be the main conflict in the story of Macbeth.

The character speaking in this scene, Macbeth is quite a strong character. This is because when Macbeth kills Duncan, he becomes more “manly” and indestructible. This seems different from his previous state of mind. In the monologue, words like “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow”, reflect that Macbeth thinks that every day is the same and that things will never change, which shows that Macbeth is tired of having to go through the same days every day. The words “There would have been a time for such a word” represents the feeling of sorrow that Macbeth is experiencing after he is told about lady Macbeth’s death contributing to his overall mental state because everything that he has ever wanted he has except for his wife.

If it was up to me to stage this scene, I would most likely make the actors playing Macbeth in his room in order to set the mood of sadness because before he would be in the room with lady Macbeth but now that she is dead he will be alone in such a big room. This might represent Macbeth‘s feelings of sorrow after he realizes that lady Macbeth has died. If I were to direct the actors, then I would most likely encourage Macbeth to behave his shoulders down, and give off a feeling of being sad in an effort to make his character believable. I would do this because then if his shoulders are down then it shows how he has lost strength and how the death of lady Macbeth has affected him.

In this monologue, Shakespeare used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. As I mentioned before, the main theme in this scene would be the sadness and the use of poetic elements really reinforces the impact of Macbeth‘s emotions. For example, Shakespeare used repetition as a feature in his writing to provide sorrow and sadness. This example was used before and the quote is “Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow”, the use of repetition caused like an infinite mood, it doesn’t make sense but by repeating “tomorrow” he is feeling like everything is the same.

All in all, the monologue in Act 5, Scene 5 is a prime example of an effective piece of writing by Shakespeare that this monologue was the falling action of the story because Macbeth now has to deal with the death of lady Macbeth. Right after this, he is informed that the trees are moving and then he goes to war. So with the thought of lady Macbeth being dead, it could affect him in the battlefield.


Macbeth’s Dilemma

The passage I chose was Act 1 Scene 3 Lines 143-164, and it was the soliloquy he had after hearing the witches prophecies and being named thane of cawdor. This scene is basically about how after the battle between Scotland and Norway, Macbeth and Banquo hear the witches prophecies and then Macbeth gets named Thane Of Cawdor meaning the prophecies are becoming true which then leads on to Macbeth planning on killing Duncan. But I chose this passage because it was easier and i understand Macbeth and what hes trying to say and what’s going on.  

In this passage, Macbeth is the only one talking because he is saying his soliloquy. He’s all by himself, he is speaking his most inner thoughts out loud because he plans on doing something to make the other prophecies for himself true. Macbeth is at his place speaking to himself. It is daytime and duncan has just named Macbeth Thane of Cawdor since the other one was a traitor. I guess the Central Conflict of the story is Macbeth’s ego/desire gets the best of him and he wants to become king because as said in the prophecies. And i guess its not shown because lady macbeth would be a part of it as seen further in the play. 

In this scene Macbeth is shown not to be but is a dynamic character. It shows he’s a dynamic character because he thinks about wanting to kill duncan because he wants to be the king as said in his prophecies. But at the same time not because later on, Lady Macbeth has to manipulate him into killing duncan because she believes that he is too pure and kind. As she said he is filled with the milk of human kindness. And some other things hes said to show he’s a dynamic character is would be how he just thought of killing it by himself as  soon as he finished talking to Duncan. 

For this scene, if I were directing this play, I would  most likely film in an abandoned large school that old, and film Macbeth talking to himself with a little fog coming in and a lil sunlight to make it look like a spotlight and make it more dramatic. And i’ll have him look crazy and act crazy and walk around as if he is talking to someone else. I would direct it like this because in movies it gives a scary and mysterious and dramatic affect because it shows they’re talking to themselves and how its a solo act/scene. 

A theme that is illustrated by this scene is Death and Possibly dreams. It shows the theme death because he thinks about killing Duncan for a good deal. It shows how his death has meaning which means that Macbeth prophecy can come true which means he will become king. But this also illustrates Dream because he is deciding and thinking of Duncan’s murder. and he imagine it in his head and how it makes him feel. 

Photo by MikesPhotos (Pixabay)


Macbeth Soliloquy Analysis

I picked lines 44 through 55 of Act 2 Scene 1 because I thought the flow of  Macbeth’s speech would be easier to remember. There seems to be a pattern in the soliloquy with the choice of words, which would help me memorize where each line goes. I also picked this scene because of the way that Macbeth’s sanity was shown, and how his mood changes.

In this monologue, Macbeth is in his castle during the night when everyone else is asleep, speaking of his thoughts of killing Duncan before he does the deed of the actual murder. He’s seeing a dagger in front of him, when it isn’t actually there. The fact that he is hallucinating right before he murders his king, shows how nervous and how mentally unstable he is at this point.

Macbeth is a dynamic character because he goes through a lot of character development. In the beginning of the book, Lady Macbeth tries persuading him to kill the king while he does not want to and thinks it’s a crazy idea. In this monologue, he is so out of it that he literally imagines a dagger in front of him, right before he pulls his actual dagger out to go and actually murder Duncan. Macbeth says, “Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?” In this quote, he is admitting that he is ill, mentally.

I would stage this scene in an area where no one else would be in the middle of the night, because Macbeth is talking to himself and reflecting on how he’s feeling. I might choose to stage him in the bathroom where he is looking at himself in the mirror, possibly washing his face to wake him up a bit before he leaves to kill the king.

One theme that this monologue illuminates is self doubt. Macbeth is doubting his own sanity because he’s hallucinating and questioning himself. Shakespeare uses elements of poetry to get this theme across by using phrases such as “heat-oppressed brain”, “fatal vision”, “false creation” and using rhythm in the soliloquy. It makes the speech seem more intense and meaningful to Macbeth’s state of mind. 


On Hecate’s Monologue

Hecate’s monologue in act three in which she scolds the three Witches shows us much more about her character and her relationship with the three Witches. By understanding Hecate further we can better understand the world of the Witches and their power structure. In this short scene, we see the three witches punished at the hands of their leader as she proclaims herself to be the “mistress of your charms” (3.5.5). As mistress is the feminine term for master, we can infer that the witches are indeed her underlings, or at the very least under her control or in her convent. The place in which they meet is rather vague, but it is night, and there is thunder present in the scene. Out of the three Witches to speak, the first Witch is the only one who has lines in this scene, when they first enter, and when they exit.

 As these four characters are specifically shrouded in mystery and ambiguity we cannot really tell if a change has happened inside the minds of these characters. Hecate, in particular, appears for the first time in the play in this scene, so her character cannot be dynamic or static by this point in the scene as she has such a small role. As for the other Witches, they have not changed their opinions about the current situation as it is not their place as seers in this plot. The Witches are specifically written as static characters as they have no need to change their minds as either they can see the future and the truth to what lies ahead. Alternatively, they are manipulative women, and yet still they are static characters as they need not interfere with plans of their own making. 

The motives behind each of these characters are complex and vague. The motives behind the Witches and Hecate are largely unknown, and most speculation can lead down one of two paths. The first path is one of destiny, magic, and faith. This string of ideas shows us that the Witches are motivated by their ability to see the future and help someone’s destiny be realized. This idea would be maintained by the thought that the Witches do actually use magic, and can accurately see and tell the future. In this version, they would not be acting of their own personal motivations. They would be acting parallel to the idea of destiny, and the will of the future. 

The second option outlines the strictly realistic aspects of Macbeth. In this idea, the Witches are knowledgeable and uncanny wildcards that seek to push Macbeth in one specific direction. This option is centered around their personal motives (whatever they may be) as there is no larger ‘force’ for the Witches to actively maintain or help. This idea is also connected to the idea that Macbeth acted solely on his own accords as the Witches were vague in their prophecies. This is where the story becomes much more personal, and Hecate, as the master of the Witches becomes more of a puppet master than a priestess for fate. 

This monologue shows us some very interesting motifs of power. With the Scotts and their noble families, there is a hierarchy shown as there is a king, his trusted nobles, and everyone else. The Witches, on the other hand, show us another hierarchy. The matriarch, instead of the patriarch, Hecate is the leader of the Witches Coven, and she governs their use of their practice. This also alludes to the themes of Femininity being fae (magical). Lady Macbeth is shown to be more magical or mystic with her chanting, and her insanity later on. Shakespeare often conveys this through the use of prose instead of iambic pentameter. 

While the Witches are said to look very manly with their beards, this may just be an insult to their clothing or class. They are also specifically referred to as the Weird Sisters by Macbeth. Furthermore, Hecate in greek (and roman) mythology is the goddess of witchcraft and many other ghost-like entities. As a goddess, she is feminine, similar to the genders of the other Witches. Therefore we can sufficiently justify that in Macbeth, many female characters (at least four) are closely associated with the art of magic or the occult. 


Macbeth: A Tale of Guilt

✧・゚: *✧・゚:* monologue analysis! *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

For my monologue project, I selected lines from one of the most insightful scenes (in my opinion), from Shakespeare’s play; Macbeth. I chose to learn act 3, scene 2, lines 41-63 as my monologue; since I think it is one of the most revealing monologues regarding the emotional state of the protagonist.

The monologue consists of the main character, Macbeth; speaking to his wife about what is troubling him. This monologue is strictly between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth- since they were speaking in private. The monologue takes place in the Macbeth residence, where after killing the king (Duncan), Macbeth begins to feel uneasy. The main conflict in this scene would most likely be the impact of giult- upon an unstable mind. I say this because after killing the king, Macbeth starts to feel guilty for what he has done- further damaging his mental health as time goes on (which, over time, builds up to be a main conflict in the story of Macbeth).

The character speaking in this scene (Macbeth) is quite a dynamic character. This is because after murdering King Duncan, Macbeth becomes mentally unstable, and paranoid of fate- seemingly contradictory to his previous state of mind. In the monologue, words like “bloody” hand, as well as the word choice in the sentence “good things of day begin to droop and drowse” reflect the murder that Macbeth commited- ridding the kingdom of a peaceful and good authoritarian figure, only to be replaced with himself. The words “O, full of scorpions is my mind” represents the feeling of guilt that Macbeth is experiencing after committing the crime- contributing to his overall decline in mental stability.

If it was up to me to stage this scene, I would most likely make the actors playing Macbeth and Lady Macbeth stand in a darkly-lit place in order to set the mood of an enclosed space (representing Macbeth’s feelings of guilt closing in on him, after he realizes that what he has done was wrong). I would also perhaps add some props to the scene, for Macbeth to perhaps drop or throw against the ground in order to show his declining mental state after killing Duncan. If I was to direct the actors, then I would most likely encourage Macbeth to be a bit dramatic, and give off a feeling of being unhinged in an effort to make his character believable. 

In this monologue, Shakespeare used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. The main theme in this scene would be the impact of guilt (as  mentioned before); and the use of poetic elements really enforces the impact of Macbeth’s emotions. For example, Shakespeare used iambic pentameter as a feature in his writing to provide a rhythm to his lines, as well as create depth in certain parts of the dialogue.

All in all, the monologue in act 3, scene 2; is a prime example of an effective piece of Shakespearian writing that develops its characters, gives them depth, and makes the story establish themes that readers can connect to as well as understand on a deeper level. 

*the image for this document is from a graphic novel adaptation of Macbeth- and portrays Macbeth’s final scene of the play*

https://www.youthvoices.live/series/macbeth/