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Writing with AI Mojo

Introduction

I believe that Ai did a good job overall, but there are some things that I need to change because they added to my essay. Nevertheless, I think it is beneficial to use Ai because it teaches us how to write better essays by using stronger words. As an ELM student, I believe that the Ai has taught me how to write better, spell better, and change my weaker words with stronger ones that will help people understand my work. Students like me might find it useful, but they shouldn’t utilize all of Ai’s vocabulary. however, they may use the Ai concept to begin their essay.

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In Kiese Laymon’s book Long Division, the author uses time travel and satire to explore themes of race, history, and identity. Through time travel, the author creates a sense of continuity and familiarity between the reader and the characters, as well as allowing for a detailed analysis of the use of time and space. Laymon also uses two parallel narratives to explore how two adolescents of different backgrounds interact with each other and the world around them.

Satire is a major component of Laymon’s writing style. As Esther B notes, “City uses satire and comedy to both laud and condemn Lavander in his criticism of him, expressing his feelings and ideas about him.” Laymon’s use of satire allows the reader to see the folly or vices of individuals, communities, or societal norms through comedy, irony, exaggeration, and mockery. In addition, City employs humor to defend their sexuality and compare Lavanger’s scent to that of a “little beast,” as Esther B points out. This allows readers to recognize the complexity of small-town life and consider their own communities critically.

Laymon also uses parody to highlight the importance of language and education. Esther B mentions how the book “opens with a parody of a grammar quiz show called ‘Can You Use That Word in a Sentence?’” This shows how language and education are often misused in American society to oppress and exclude people.

As the book progresses, there is still much left to uncover. What happened to the girl who went missing and how does City’s time-traveling affect his future? What will happen when City and Lavander reunite? How will the author continue to use satire and parody to explore the themes of race, history, and identity? These are the questions that remain to be answered and should be explored as the novel progresses.

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In her book Long Division, Kiese Laymon introduces readers to City, a young man with an exceptional capacity for time travel. He is caught up in a complicated investigation involving a girl who has gone missing and the effects of his time travel. Laymon uses time travel and historical time jumps to establish a feeling of continuity and the focus is placed on two opposing parallel narratives featuring an African American adolescent and a multiracial adolescent. Through these two perspectives, Laymon explores race, history, and time.

The novel’s structure creates a sense of familiarity and connection between the reader and the characters. This is especially true in chapter three, which highlights the use of satire. City uses satire and comedy to both laud and condemn Lavander in his criticism of him, expressing his feelings and ideas about him. He insults other characters and expresses his opinions regarding racial and gender stereotypes through satire, sarcasm, humor, and exaggeration. Laymon’s satirical and commentary-based writing style is a potent tool for highlighting the complexity of small-town life and inspiring readers to consider their communities critically.

The novel also opens with a parody of a grammar quiz show called “Can You Use That Word in a Sentence?” that mocks how language and education are frequently employed in American society as means of oppression and exclusion. This reflects City’s opinion on Lavander’s use of language, as referenced in Chapter 4. By using humor to defend their sexuality and compare Lavander’s scent to a little beast in their criticism of it, City expresses their opinion of the situation.

As the novel progresses, the reader is left with many unanswered questions. What will City discover through his time travels? How will his investigation of the missing girl unfold? How will the parallel narratives resolve? What will be the consequences of the City’s time travels? As the novel continues, readers can look forward to learning more about these questions and uncovering the mysteries of Long Division.

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Kiese Laymon’s Long Division is an innovative novel that weaves together two parallel narratives and uses time travel and historical time jumps to establish a feeling of continuity. The novel introduces City, a young man with an exceptional capacity for time travel, who is caught up in a complicated investigation involving a girl who has gone missing and the effects of his time travel. This narrative structure creates a sense of familiarity and connection between the reader and the characters. Laymon’s book not only explores race, history, and time, but also highlights the complexity of small-town life and inspires readers to consider their communities critically.

In Long Division, Laymon uses satire to expose the nonsense of individuals, communities, and societal norms. City employs satire and comedy to both laud and condemn Lavander in his criticism of him, expressing his feelings and ideas about him. Laymon’s satirical and commentary-based writing style is a potent tool for highlighting the complexity of small-town life and inspiring readers to consider their communities critically. Through City’s use of humor to defend their sexuality and compare Lavander’s scent to a little beast, the reader is able to gain insight into how language and education are used as tools of oppression and exclusion.

The book opens with a parody of a grammar quiz show called “Can You Use That Word in a Sentence?”. Laymon’s clever choice of an opening scene serves as a reminder that language and education are often used as a form of exclusion. Through this scene, he encourages readers to question the power dynamics between different social classes and the ability to use language as a tool of oppression.

By exploring themes of race, history, and time throughout the novel, Laymon encourages readers to think critically about their own communities. The text invites readers to consider the implications of time travel and its effects on the characters’ lives. We are also encouraged to consider the consequences of racism and its impact on the characters’ lives and experiences. Moreover, Laymon’s use of satire and wit allows us to gain insight into how language and education are used as tools of oppression and exclusion.

Although Long Division introduces a variety of themes and ideas, there is still much to uncover as the reader is taken on this journey with City. As the novel progresses, we will discover more about City’s time travel, the investigation of the missing girl, and the effects of racism. We will be able to further explore the power dynamics between different social classes, and how we can use language to challenge them. The novel will continue to raise questions and inspire readers to consider their own communities critically.

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Esther B  (11 comments)

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Apr 17 

Esther B: chapter 1:In her book Long Division, Kiese Laymon introduces readers to City, a young man with an exceptional capacity for time travel. He is caught up in a complicated investigation involving a girl who has gone missing and the effects of his time travel. [Edited]

REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: Chapter 2: Long Division by Kiese Laymon uses time travel and historical time jumps to establish a feeling of continuity. and the focus is placed on Kiese Laymon’s novel, Long Division. the chapter provides a detailed analysis of the use of time, and space. [Edited]REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: chapter3:Two opposing parallel narratives are highlighted in Kiese Laymon’s book Long Division, one featuring an African American adolescent and one featuring a multiracial adolescent. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: chapter4:Kiese Laymon’s Long Division explores race, history, and time through two sections: 1985 and 2013. In 1985, City travels through the past to stop his mother’s slaying and discovers the background of racism in America. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: because the narrative structure’s consistency creates a sense of familiarity and connection between the reader and the characters by the novel’s use of time travel and self-referential aspects. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: Satire is a literary device that exposes the folly or vices of individuals, communities, or societal norms through comedy, irony, exaggeration, or mockery. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: I agree because City uses satire and comedy to both laud and condemn Lavander in his criticism of him, expressing his feelings and ideas about him. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: yes true because I nice that Citoyen Coldson insults other characters and expresses his opinions regarding racial and gender stereotypes using satire, sarcasm, humor, and exaggeration. This chapter gives us a taste of the humor and sarcasm. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: I feel that Laymon’s satirical and commentary-based writing style is a potent tool for highlighting the complexity of small-town life and inspiring readers to consider their communities critically. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: I also think City uses humor to defend their sexuality and compare Lavander’s scent to a little beast in their criticism of it as a way of expression. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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Apr 17 

Esther B: think that this book opens with a parody of a grammar quiz show called “Can You Use That Word in a Sentence?” that mocks how language and education are frequently employed in American society as means of oppression and exclusion. REPLYVIEW IN CONTEXT

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