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  • Dear Laura:

    I am thrilled by your post, “Coding for Children” because you speak about the importance of teaching children how to code at a young age. Coding is a skill that children need to learn in order to understand technology and the world we live in.

    One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Teaching children to code is an impor…Read More

  • Dear Khurram:

    I am captivated by your post, “Scratch Programming: My Starting Journey” because you made an interesting point on whether children benefit more from direct instruction or feed their curiosity by allowing them to investigate topics on their own.

    One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is, “Our job as teachers is to help stude…Read More

  • Dear Marina:

    I am amazed by your post, “Marina’s Scratch Funhouse” because you went in-depth with how computational thinking can be incorporated into writing workshop. I have read many articles about how computational thinking can be applied to any discipline, but I have not come across an article that explains in detail how this is possi…Read More

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    Maritza wrote a new post

    Computational Thinkers NOT Robots

    How can parents support the development of computational thinking in young children? People usually say that children are too young to develop computational thinking, but there are age-appropriate computer programs and activities that can help introduce computational thinking in...

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    • Dear Maritza:

      I really enjoyed your post on “Computational Thinkers NOT Robots”. It was well written and certainly a lot of ground was covered in this piece. You definitely brought up a lot of interesting points. One sentence that you wrote which stood out to me was your opening line when you said How can parents support the development of computational thinking in young children? Not only is this an excellent question to grab the readers attention but it’s a great question in general to the topic as well. One of the biggest challenges is for parents to figure out how to help their students with their academics. It’s hard to support children with their thinking in general because they have a lot to learn and experience as they age and get older. To support their computational thinking is a whole new challenge within itself. To teach children how to think a certain way to complete a task while their logic is still developing isn’t easy at all. I loved your solution that suggested that teachers should work with the parents to help develop computational thinking in young children. I think this is the best strategy to help students work towards a common goal and knowing how to think. I’d like to thank you for writing about this topic because it was very good and made me think about a lot of things in relation to this. I look forward to seeing what you’ll write about next I think that parents need to be more involved with their children’s education to help them apply what they learn outside the classroom as you said.

    • Dear Maritza:

      I really enjoyed reading your post “Computational Thinkers NOT Robots”You highlighted key points about the children’s s computational thinking as well as parents’ involvement. As we learned, parents’ participation is essential for their child’s education and learning. 
       
      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Young children can use their computational thinking across different content areas and everyday contexts that do not require the use of a computer.” I think this is very important to know because some people can have the misconception about computational thinking. As you mentioned before, this promotes children in different subject areas not only with computers. 
       
      Another sentence that I agree with was: “Teachers should work together with parents to help develop computational thinking in young children.” This stood out for me because teachers and parents should work together for the benefit of the child. Sometimes parents are not aware of how they can support their child, and if teachers provide parents with information this will help the child to succeed. 
       
      Have you seen this article https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-12-11-parents-don-t-need-to-be-coding-experts-just-willing-to-learn-with-their-children? I thought you might be interested in this because some parents may be afraid of computational thinking and this article talks about how parents do not need to be an expert to support their child with coding. 
       
      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because I really enjoy reading your post. You mention essential information that I will keep in mind such as working together with the student’s parents.

    • Dear Maritza: 

      I am uplifted your post, “Computational Thinkers NOT Robots,” because right from the start you identify that computation thinking is a process that should be included within the early childhood curriculum. Also, you recognize that not everyone may agree with this statement but continue your argument with solid reasons for why its inclusion is necessary. Finally, I am excited by your motivation and commitment to support a home-school connection around computational thinking skills so that your learners can implement these skills in more than one setting. 

      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “People usually say that children are too young to develop computational thinking, but there are age-appropriate computer programs and activities that can help introduce computational thinking in young children.” I think this is a common misunderstanding because people do not always realize that computational thinking is a part of what many people of all ages do every day to complete tasks. Additionally, people often assume that computational thinking means more time on the computer and an increase in screen time. However, as you mentioned in your post, there are so many ways to support the development of computational thinking without even turning on a computer.  

      Have you seen this presentation, Reading, Writing, …. and Computing? Teaching Coding to Young Children? I thought you might be interested in this because the speaker focuses on the significance that early childhood computational thinking experiences have on coding development. She shares how the youngest learners in her school using coding tools that are screen-free and this supports the role and sequence of computational thinking. Additionally, she stresses how she believes that these tools align with essential components for young people: play, exploration, and movement.  

      Another sentence that I strongly agree with was: “I believe that if teachers and parents work together, they will not only prepare children to think creatively and define and solve their own problems, they will also help strengthen their relationship with that child.” This stood out for me because I also believe that the partnership between families and school is essential to the success of the child. Working as a team, family members and educators can identify areas of strength and next steps for a learner. Educators can gain valuable information from family members. This includes discovering the child’s passions and interests, strengths, and learning history. In turn, educators can make recommendations based on the whole child as to how a family can support learning at home. This is not only true with computational thinking, but in all areas. Helping families to identify where content goals live within their home lives is a unique way to help the learner practice using skills in more than one setting. 

      Thanks for your writing and sharing your ideas. 

      Marina 

    • Dear Maritza:
      I am intrigued by your post, “ Computational Thinkers NOT Robots,” because the title alone dismantle a bias that many people might hold. I know that when I first thought about computational thinking, I solely thought about codes that were complex and a bunch of 1s and 0s. I had never considered that computational thinking was far more than one’s ability to arrange difficult codes to achieve a certain action.

      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Young children can use their computational thinking across different content areas and everyday context that do not require the use of a computer.” I think this is quote is so interesting because I think the main assumption that many hold is that computational thinking is solely useful when interacting with a computer. Computational thinking is accessible and available beyond a computer. 

      Another sentence that I enjoyed was: “Teachers should work together with parents to help develop computational thinking in young children.” This stood out for me because many times, we seek to learn about how we as educators can carry out instruction in the classroom, forgetting the importance that parents also have in their children’s learning. Involving parents in what we do in the classroom and also teaching them the content we are presenting allows them to support our students while at home. 
       Have you seen this resource “Computational Thinking Activities”? ( https://www.stem.family/activities/computational-thinking-activities/ ) I thought you might be interested in this because of the variety of activites that students can engage in that require them to computationally think in a fun way.

      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because your writing style is truly enjoyable to read. 

    • Maritza,
      I enjoy the opinions you’ve shared on your post “Computational Thinkers NOT Robots”. I especially liked the various examples from Scratch that you’ve provided. I personally used scratch from 6th-9th grade for various projects, and I completely agree that it teaches young kids how to problem solve, but furthermore I believe that it acts as a “first step” to young people who want to get into coding.

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