• Liann wrote a new post

    Jane Eyre: A Lesson in Writing

    Charlotte Bronte’s impressive world-building skills are apparent from the very first chapter of her magnum opus, Jane Eyre. The novel begins with a description of the dreary, dark weather, reflecting the neglected state of Jane as well as establishing...

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  • Liann wrote a new post

    Native Cuisine: A Story of Oppression

    Cuisine may be essential to assimilation and acceptance for immigrants within American society, but what is its significance for the indigenous peoples who inhabited the land long before European contact? Ironically, Americans know little to nothing about indigenous cuisine,...

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    1 Comment
    • Great post, Liann!

      I appreciate your post because it is important to recognize that there are effects to colonization that ultimately lead indigenous peoples to feel stripped of their cultural identity, and cuisine can certainly champion the representation of one’s identity. As I read in your post, it is disheartening to hear that the government has done so little to help indigenous peoples with upholding their food needs to ensure that their cultural heritage is protected.

      Your comparison between the fast food chain’s failure to represent Native cuisine, but ability to represent Chinese American’s cuisine through Panda Express is interesting to me, as you demonstrate that Natives represent a larger percentage of the United States’ population. I, too wrote about the United States’ relationship with food, and unfortunately, I, too found poor trends in how we handle the important role that cuisine has on our life. I appreciate that you raised awareness about the cultural issues that our country has with cuisine, as I wrote about the health issues that our country has with cuisine.

      I look forward to what you will write next, as you shed light into fundamentally crucial cultural issues that our country has faced and will continue to face.

  • The speaker contorts the carpe diem sentiment by creating an overwhelming sense of urgency and playing on the fears of growing old in order to pressure his lover into an intimate and sacred act that is supposed to represent a selfless giving of oneself to another.

    I chose this gif because it represents how the speaker only takes his lustful…Read More

  • The speaker contorts the carpe diem sentiment by creating an overwhelming sense of urgency and playing on the fears of growing old in order to pressure his lover into an intimate and sacred act that is supposed to represent a selfless giving of oneself to another.

    I chose this gif because it represents how the speaker only takes his lustful…Read More

  • Liann wrote a new post

    A bulldozer to his plaything

    The speaker in “To His Coy Mistress” is persistent, certainly a force to be reckoned with. However, his domineering nature does not lend itself to a charming and “nice” guy. Rather, his beautiful words and mastery of language become...

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    1 Comment
    • I’m really interested in this part:

      “Love is a selfless act of giving, yet here the speaker violates the purity of love by aggressively pushing his lover towards sex. In addition, relationships depend on mutual consent, an aspect that is clearly missing in “To His Coy Mistress.””

      For many audiences across many generations, this poem was thought to be cute or funny. What does the fact that you’re walking away with a very different and valid interpretation tell you?

  • Liann wrote a new post

    The Intersection of Culture and Cuisine

    When asked what the American cuisine is, many will respond by saying “french fries,” “hamburgers,” or “high cholesterol.” Others might insist that the American cuisine does not even exist. While the United States may be known for its greasy...

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    2 Comments
    • Great post Liann! I believe the generally accepted American cuisine would probably be burgers or hotdogs, and I think it’s really cool that the imitation of cultural cuisine from different parts of the world can also be considered as “American cuisine”. I am grateful to the immigrants that brought their cultural food with them to America. Although some people see it as dishonorable, there are people who make and sell true cultural food. The fact that I’m able to eat authentic Chinese food or Indian food without having to travel to those places is a huge part of why America is so great.

      -Alvaro C

    • Liann, this post is so fun! I didn’t know about the American origins of spaghetti and meatballs, and it’s cool how food is a signifier of the new Old world-American cultures which emerge from emigration to the United States. It wasn’t until I got a chance to travel that I leaned those hyphenated cultures, Greek-American, Italian-American, Japanese-American, etc. really are their own things separate and distinct from Greek, Italian, and Japanese, and separate and they certainly feel separate distinct from American. Delving into what it means to be part of a hyphenated culture could be a really cool follow-up piece to this one.

      Like spaghetti and meatballs, foods like saganaki and fortune cookies are other examples of food with American origins and ethnic flair. Other follow-up pieces could also profile some of these hyphen culture foods.

      Very cool, Liann!

  • Liann wrote a new post

    The Importance of a Second Language in a Multilingual World

    Today, although most of the world is multilingual, many Americans are not fluent in a second language. This is due to the lack of emphasis on foreign language by the United States education system as only ten states require...

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    4 Comments
    • I am shocked about your post because not many people talk about this topic and i think its a very important topic.
      One sentence that struck out to me was ,” Travel requires the desire and willingness to adapt to new cultures. In some occupations, it is essential to be able to communicate with many different peoples as the global business community has become more and more integrated.’’ I felt that this a very important besides just seeing a country, learning about its culture is what makes such a difference between visiting it and actually getting to know it.
      Another sentence that stood out to me was “ Today, although most of the world is multilingual, many Americans are not fluent in a second language.”.I agree because when they travel or meet other people that don’t speak English or understand the American culture they might get mad and feel like they should learn English and the same goes for Americans.
      Thank you for your writing ,i hope to read more!
      BY:Taz #harvest

    • Dear Liann :
      I am surprised by your post, “The Importance of a Second Language in a Multilingual World,” because it is shocking to know how important knowing a second language is in order to communicate with others.
      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “learning a second language is highly beneficial as it leads to heightened cultural understanding, an attribute much needed in today’s divided world, and offers a host of cognitive advantages”. I think this is important because we must realize that learning different languages can create connections between people and other cultures.
      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because the information that you give seems very important.
      Ashley

    • Hi Liann

      I think your post is very interesting and think you formatted everything very well. It was very easy for me to read and I agree with you that a second language would be very beneficial to all. I also agree with you when you said that a second form of communication could provide a foundation for success later in life.

      -Maya

    • Hello Liann,
      I thought your paper was spot on that learning a second language is highly beneficial leading to culture understanding, encouraging empathy, and openness of other cultures. As a person who is bilingual I have an Insight to two cultures and that allows me to communicate to a wider range of people.
      Good job!!

  • Liann wrote a new post

    The Western Wall: A Pilgrimage for Identity

    Throughout history, people have traveled to sites they hold sacred in order to request divine intercession and strengthen their spiritual bond via self-reflection. This practice, known as a pilgrimage, was very common during the Middle Ages as religion was...

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