• I definitely agree with your point regarding mental health and racism being top priorities for our leaders here in America. I think the two issues can also go hand in hand, as increased tensions because of systematic racism can be detrimental to ones health. Separately, I think these topics both address issues of ignorance in America. We, as a…[Read more]

  • Dear Leaders of America,

    I am a white, cisgender, middle class college student living in the Midwest. I am a liberal, feminist, ally, and I stand for equality and justice for all people. I’ve been researching t

    • Dear Kristin,
      I completely agree with everything you said in this article. It was well written and organized and really addressed the fact that we are doing little to nothing to fix the problems that we are encountering because of the hate that people have towards people they dont know. I agree that we need better leadership and too be examples of love and not hate if anything is going to get better. I think voting is vital to getting any change, but as of now its not an election so I would be interested in hearing what else you think we could do to help other than voting and being an example ourselves. This is an link to a thing I read a while back that got me to understand more about the importance of voting when I didnt think my vote really mattered. http://lifestyle.allwomenstalk.com/this-is-why-we-all-need-to-vote-for-those-who-are-18-but-hesitant-about-elections I really hope that America can overcome all the hate that we’ve been dealing with lately. Thank you for sharing your opinion on the subject.

    • Your argument is very powerful, but I think it would be fruitful to emphasize a less biased point of view. In this way, you may be able to get your point across without offending anyone, and that way maybe those who would typically disagree with your argument might read further into the reasons you chose it. Using strong language and a hard bias in the beginning can often times turn many people away. I think this (https://www.theodysseyonline.com/unbiased-donald-trumps-political-platform) would be a good source to use as an example. It’s difficult, but still possible to engage in an argument without bias while still supporting your own cause. I absolutely agree with your statements, but others may turn the other way because of the forceful language used. However, your argument is well stated. America should be greater for all, not just some, and that means equality, justice, and rights for all, not just the so-called majority.

    • Kristin, I think that everything you’re saying absolutely needs to be addressed. One part that stuck out to me specifically was when you mentioned kids being taught peace, love, and care for one another. I do wonder though if our kids are still being taught that. I have cousins in the elementary school system, two of them are still in first grade, the other is in middle school, and I have noticed that they are not the kindest. It may be that I don’t remember being a kid that well, but what I do remember is though there were class bullies it never went as far as what I’ve been seeing today. My older cousin, the seventh grade, has divided people by whether they are “red necks” or “fancy” based solely on their appearance and the way they dress for school. My younger cousin, she’s a girl in third grade, has mentioned that she likes a few girls, but doesn’t want to be friends with them because of how they do their hair. I may have some exceptionally judgmental cousins, but I also wonder if kids today could be starting to lose the affinity for peace, love, and care for one another because they are learning how to behave by example of their parents. Do you think that helping the parents to open their eyes up to peace, love, and care would help children be less judgmental based on appearance, or do you think that kids today have already learned enough from their parents that depending on their age we cannot help show them the good things either. I would be really interested to hear your thoughts on this, and this was not written to criticize your post or diminish what you were saying, it’s just something I observed and am interested to hear your thoughts on. If you’re interested in looking into a parents effect on their children as it relates to your article, I’ve found an article that you could look at https://my.vanderbilt.edu/developmentalpsychologyblog/2014/05/parental-influence-on-the-emotional-development-of-children/

    • Hi Kristin,
      I am in total agreement of what you’ve written. When you propose that we need to be encouraging people to vote, I think it’s necessary to also emphasize education. Voter participation is extremely important, but having educated voters is what we should truly strive for, otherwise we will continue having leaders such as our president today. On the topic of our president, his response (or lack there of) to Charlottesville shows exactly how not to educate people. By not vehemently condemning white supremacists and neo-nazis, Trump sends a message that it is acceptable. We need an educated population of educated voters who know not to vote for men who don’t condemn racism.

    • Dear Kristin,
      I completely agree with everything you said in this article. It was well written and organized and really addressed the fact that we are doing little to nothing to fix the problems that we are encountering because of the hate that people have towards people they dont know. I agree that we need better leadership and too be examples of love and not hate if anything is going to get better. I think voting is vital to getting any change, but as of now its not an election so I would be interested in hearing what else you think we could do to help other than voting and being an example ourselves. This is an link to a thing I read a while back that got me to understand more about the importance of voting when I didnt think my vote really mattered. http://lifestyle.allwomenstalk.com/this-is-why-we-all-need-to-vote-for-those-who-are-18-but-hesitant-about-elections I really hope that America can overcome all the hate that we’ve been dealing with lately. Thank you for sharing your opinion on the subject.

    • Dear Kristin,

      This letter is so wonderfully written. I could not agree more with what you are saying. These white supremacists also go against everything I was taught as a child. My parents rose above my hate-filled town and taught their children to love all people regardless of our differences. My parents instilled the idea that all people deserve respect and equality. I agree that this weak “leadership” has had the poorest reaction to the Charlottesville situation and it will continue to have poor reactions to racism. I agree that we need to start from within and fix ourselves; setting standard in place to ward off racism and hate of any kind. Our country was already great, we were beginning to come together, that’s when our nation will truly be great, not when we are divided into different classes, races, etc., but when we are in unity.

    • Kristin, Thank you for being an ally. I have spoken with many white people who do not see an issue with the way the country is dealing with this issues. They also don’t view them as issues. It breaks my heart to know that there are people who are not affected by the deaths of hundreds of blacks at the hands of police and white supremacists. I think the issue is that kids are not being taught to love in general, they are being taught to love what looks like them, acts like them, and talks like them. And if it is anything other than that they are taught to hate it. We cant change the world until we reconstruct the REAL principles that it was built on.

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