Profile Photo

EdOffline

  • eryon
  • Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
  • 14

    Posts

  • 22

    Comments

  • 128

    Views

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

     

    In section 3 of act 1 of Shakespeare’s Othello, Othello is under scrutiny surrounding accusations from Desdemona’s father. Desdemona’s father accuses Othello of foul play and witchcraft in his wooing of Desdem

    Othello Analysis & Close Read

      In section 3 of act 1 of Shakespeare’s Othello, Othello is under scrutiny surrounding accusations from Desdemona’s father. Desdemona’s father accuses Othello of foul play and witchcraft in his wooing of Desdemona, but Othello is quick to deny all...

    Read More
  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    There isn’t any magic formula to parenting. There are countless factors going into raising a kid with innumerable decisions that have to be made in trying to decide how to handle your children. One parenting s

    How to raise kids into healthy young adults?

    There isn’t any magic formula to parenting. There are countless factors going into raising a kid with innumerable decisions that have to be made in trying to decide how to handle your children. One parenting style that I see...

    Read More
    7 Comments
    • Ed,
      After reading your post it left me wondering where my family dynamic and others fits into your research. It’s amazing how much influence parents actions have on children and just how much they absorb. I never knew that not only can behaviors and skills affect development but also they way we react to those behaviors. In the article, https://www.livestrong.com/article/75282-parents-effect-child-behavior/, it discusses the affects of stress and how the way parents react to stress could directly correlate to children’s reactions to stress. I look forward to hearing more.

    • Dear Writer, as stated in your second paragraph ” “In order for teens to grow up, they need to have the opportunity to experience the freedom of making their own decisions (age appropriate) and the opportunity to learn from mistakes”. How would a parent go about if their young adults keeps making wrong decisions. Also you could’ve explained what the helicopter method of parenting is???but nun the less its a good and strong piece.

      • Octavio,

        Thank you for your comment. Helicopter parenting is a term used to describe overwhelming or overbearing parenting behaviors in which parents stifle growth in young people through making all of their decisions for them/shielding them from all kinds of stress. If children or teens continually make unreasonable decisions then it is the parent’s job to come in and speak rationally with them, so the parent and kid can come to a logical conclusion together. Allowing kids the freedom to understand the significance of their decisions is an indisposable element of their growth.

        There is more information on the topic in a few of my other posts –
        Edward

    • Dear Edward. Great post, I do believe that Helicopter parents can hurt the Childs growth mentally but we must take into consideration of how this prevents the child from physical harm? Helicopter parents ultimately want to keep there beloved child safe. With respect to the helicopter parents I do believe that there are certain teirs into helicopter parents, the spectrum of extreme to anxious are the 2 ends of the teir system. I suggest this from past personal experiences with “helicopter moms” so i cannot provide any supporting documents. good luck with your research

    • Ed,
      I believe that you are correct in your stance on parenting young adults. I agree that parents should watch over their teenagers and let them make their own mistakes. I have witnessed the negative effects of bad parenting myself. The kids that haven’t been given the chances to make bad decisions and learn from them seem to be arrogant and lack empathy. I think that this article will help you further your research https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/beastly-behavior/201608/yes-overprotective-parenting-harms-kids

    • Hi,
      I really enjoyed reading this article most times we only hear parenting advice coming from Adults but shouldn’t we be learning how to parent with advice from children as well. I loved the line ” “In order for teens to grow up, they need to have the opportunity to experience the freedom of making their own decisions (age appropriate) and the opportunity to learn from mistakes. When parents place a certain level of trust in their teen, the teen will be more likely to respect the parents as well as their rules.” Parents should be overseeing their children, but as they move into becoming teenagers and becoming adults they need to have experiences that let them learn real lessons for themselves. They have to be allowed to make mistakes and learn from them.” I agree with this line not because I want to be a rebellious teen because I truly believe this is how you should grow up. This is how I was raised and I know 100% any time im faced with a bad situation all I think about is how sad my parents would be because of the trust they hold with me. That is what keeps me from partaking in things I shouldnt do. I don’t know that I would react that same way if my parents were constantly strict with me and had no trust with me.

    • Hello Ed,
      I really liked reading your post. I agree that the only way for children to grow up into successful young men and women is to let them make their own mistakes and learn from it themselves. My only doubt about this theory is that I believe some children have too much freedom. Many kids can be spoiled and grow up doing anything they want without repercussions. My question is how could you avoid this as a busy parent and little time for your kids?
      Thanks you, and I hope to read more of your work soon,
      Mae.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    Helicopter parenting is a style of overbearing parenting that can have adverse effects on young people through stifling their course of self growth and independence. A 2018 study on some of the results of

    The Unforeseen Consequences of Helicopter Parenting

    Helicopter parenting is a style of overbearing parenting that can have adverse effects on young people through stifling their course of self growth and independence. A 2018 study on some of the results of helicopter parents said that they...

    Read More
    3 Comments
    • Hi Ed,

      This is a very well written article. I liked how you said that there are a lot more studies to be done and that we can’t fully conclude the effects of helicopter parenting, but that from what we do know helicopter parenting does have negative long-term effects on children. I personally think that my parents sometimes do to much for me, making it hard for me to make my own decisions and become autonomous from my parents. Parents should be a guiding support for their children, not the driving force in the decisions that they make and the things that they do. The best way to learn is from experience, so when parents are making all of the decision for their children they are missing out on that learning experience.

      I think you would really like this article:
      https://www.parents.com/parenting/better-parenting/what-is-helicopter-parenting/

    • Ed, I believe that you have crafted a very well-written essay on the problem of helicopter parenting that a lot of people do not like to address. Many children nowadays are coddled by their parents to the point where they are unable to function later in life, leading to extremely dire consequences. As a child, my parents helped me out in many activities, but made sure that I wouldn’t build up a major dependence on them later in life. I believe that you summed up this issue quite nicely in your essay with this quote:

      “While for some parents it is not easy to let your kids have some freedom, I think that without giving them exposure during their youth and letting them face and handle difficulty they will be brutally unprepared for the problems they encounter after they fly the coop.”

      Thank you for sharing this piece with us, and I will post a link to a compelling article I found relating to this topic that I think you would find useful. Thank you.

      http://www.momjunction.com/articles/whether-or-not-you-are-a-helicopter-parent_00373676/#gref

    • Hello Ed,
      I really enjoyed reading your post. I agree that although the tactic of helicopter parenting comes from the purest intention of keeping your kid safe but there can be some unseen repercussions. I believe that children who have parents such as these will find themselves trying hard to impress them with unrealistic expectations. The result is mental health issues and low self esteem. Not to mention the incapability of transitioning properly into the adult world due to too much reliance on their parents. If you want to read more about this topic I found this website: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02732173.2011.574038
      Thank you for sharing! Your post was very well written.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    Overprotective parents cause for all kinds of problems in kids, essentially through preventing them from learning how to handle difficult situations on their own, an indispensable skill for all people. Through the

    Overprotective Parenting Leads to Struggling Young People

    Overprotective parents cause for all kinds of problems in kids, essentially through preventing them from learning how to handle difficult situations on their own, an indispensable skill for all people. Through the removal of risks, challenges, fears, and hurt...

    Read More
    4 Comments
    • Ed, I found your post very interesting. I also believe that independence issues stem from the concept of helicopter parenting. I believe this type of parenting isolates a person from the real world until they are abruptly pushed into it as they become adults– which can be catastrophic. I read a very fascinating article recently (https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2016/09/how-helicopter-parents-cause-binge-drinking/492722/) about the link that exists between helicopter parenting and binge drinking in college. This article examines the correlation between the two and I think you may find it useful in your further research. This article shows how this constant isolation creates an unbalanced that causes the person to sort of “short circuit” when they reach college and engage in extremely risky behaviors as they are essentially born in to adulthood. I enjoyed reading you article and look forward to seeing where your research takes you.

    • Edward, I completely agree with your stance on overprotective parenting. I have personally seen the affects of overprotective parenting resulting in their kids lashing out and having a complete and dangerous rebellion. Although this isn’t factual, an interesting idea was brought up in the newest season of Black Mirror on Netflix where a child can have a chip installed in her so that bad things are censored when she sees them. The rest of the episode shows how dangerous this can be. You might find this article by “Psychology Today” to be interesting:
      https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/beastly-behavior/201608/yes-overprotective-parenting-harms-kids

    • Great post Ed! I believe that you are correct in your stance on overprotective parenting. I have witnessed the negative effects of overprotective parenting myself. The kids that have been overprotected seem to be very scared to answer questions or solve problems without the approval of an adult. They also cannot deal with failure very well either. I think that this article will help you further your research: https://www.livestrong.com/article/48744-side-effects-overprotective-parenting/
      Keep up the good work!

    • I really enjoyed reading this post, Ed! I really liked the line where you emphasized the difference between parents solving their kids problems for them or solving their problems with them. Based on your post I think you would like this argument (https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/beastly-behavior/201608/yes-overprotective-parenting-harms-kids). I look forward to reading your future posts!

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    Basically, there isn’t a whole lot of reasoning behind the ages put into place in America allowing certain privileges and taking away others. The legal age of adulthood is 18, yet the drinking age is 21, and you c

    When does a person become an adult?

    Basically, there isn’t a whole lot of reasoning behind the ages put into place in America allowing certain privileges and taking away others. The legal age of adulthood is 18, yet the drinking age is 21, and you can’t...

    Read More
    12 Comments
    • Ed, I find that your analysis of age limits for certain things such as voting, drinking, and being eligible for things such as war very compelling, as not many people consider why these ages were set in the first place. I am very interested to hear more about this subject because I often wonder why someone can give their life for their own country before being legally allowed to rent a car. I found a website that addresses this exact topic and will post it below. I look forward to seeing more about this in the future.

      http://www.cab.org.nz/vat/gl/roi/pages/legalagesandid.aspx

    • Edweird, I find your argument very compelling. There is no understanding by what the actual age of becoming an adult is, our government gives us an age but we can not even really do anything at that age of 18. I am interested to know why we can be tried as an adult in court, join the military, and do many other things once people turn the age of 18, although we are unable to drink, and in some states it is illegal to smoke. I have found you an article that I believe can help you find what you are looking for in your argument.
      http://www.indiana.edu/~engs/articles/cqoped.html

    • Dear Ed,

      I found you article very intriguing, this is because I never knew that you have to be 25 to rent a car. Yet, you can buy a car at any certain age. How is this possible? Being considered an adult at 18 isn’t really appropriate because some of those 18 year olds are out there partying being a teen. I’d say that a person should consider themselves an adult when they actually have their life together and actually know where there going in life. Good article sir

    • Ed,
      I really liked this article. I thought you were asking very good questions, and I think it is especially important to us as we get older and prepare to step into adult hood. I think that the age of adulthood can vary, and the laws around it aren’t incredibly clear. This https://www.thespruce.com/happy-18th-birthday-new-adult-3570791 is something I found interesting and I think you would like it.
      Lexi

    • I found this post really intersting and I agree with you on the points present. As I have approached my ‘adult years’ I have noticed that I am still treated like a child. While I am 18, I have found that myself (along with others) remain sheltered in our home lives and school lives. I find the age limits in the United States particularly confsuing. We can live on our own and fight for our country at 18 but can’t legally buy a drink. From the perspective of a young adult, the laws and restrictions present are beyond limiting to the young person. While we have certain freedoms, we still remain restricted in our ‘youth’. This whole concept is rather mind boggling to me, because I feel underprepared and misunderstood as a millennial, but so much is still expected of me.
      https://www.thenation.com/article/democrats-18-year-olds-can-fight-not-drink/

    • Ed, this is a really interesting topic, and one that is relevant to a lot of people. Although I’m 18, which is the legal age of adulthood in the US, I find that in most ways, life hasn’t actually changed a whole lot. The system in America definitely doesn’t make sense to me. For example, why are you mature enough to drive a car at 16 but not enough to sign papers yourself? Or when you’re 18, why are you considered a legal adult and mature enough to vote and be drafted, but you still aren’t mature enough to buy a drink? Or in a lot of states, why can you smoke at age 20 but not drink? I look forward to hearing more from you about this in the future.
      https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2016/01/when-are-you-really-an-adult/422487/

    • Dear Ed, as I read your post I started to think about my life as a “child”. I am not 18 years old yet but I still feel like I have the same responsibilities as an adult. I feel like the whole legal age thing puts a lot of pressure and restrictions on those who are under age. At the end of the day we all worry about the same issues and we all matter.

    • Hey there Ed, I really think that your question on legal age is interesting and has potential to spark large debates among those who support how it is now and those who do not. It is crazy to think about the amount of things people are able to do just because they turn a certain age while not even having fully developed their intelligence. It is all a matter of speculation of what should be done and how the society views people as an “adult”. The question you left the reader with is great because it causes us to wonder about how we feel about the legal age as of right now. I found an article that may be interesting in your topic.

      The legal age should be lowered to 16.

    • I think this debate has been a point of interest throughout our nation’s history. To me, 18 seems like a young age to have all the responsibilities as an adult. On the other hand however, it makes sense. By that time, most kids are off to college and need to gain the independence that turning 18 entails. Despite being a legal adult, 18 year olds are often not viewed as adults. Also, when 18 you’d think that you get the same rights as every other adult. However, this is not sure due to the age restrictions on other laws. This is a very compelling argument.

    • Ed, I found your post very interesting and provocative. I, for one, have never even considered why the age requirement for legal adulthood is 18, why drinking is legal at 21, and why renting a car is not considered legal until 25. It seems a common theme that with more life comes more mental experience and further physical development. 18 almost seems too young for legal adulthood, because although the individual is not yet physically and mentally developed, their parents have the right to completely cease giving them support. I found an article that details the pros and cons of the legal age of alcohol consumption being 21 in the United States, which I thought proposed interesting arguments as to why there should be two completely separate ages and why 18, being the legal age of adulthood, should be the legal age of alcohol consumption as well.

      https://drinkingage.procon.org

    • Dear Ed,

      I appreciate you for choosing such a great topic for many arguments. In my opinion adulthood is not an age but a mindset. I believe you do not become an adult when you turn 18 but you turn into an adult when you start acting like one. An example would be it doesn’t matter if you’re old enough to drive because what really matters is knowing how to.

    • dear Ed, i agree and enjoy a lot of what you said, like when you asked if 18 was the right age and i think about that quite often as i am becoming of that age . it is so crazy to think our brains aren’t fully developed yet..i mean for some thirty year old’s its like their brains will never develop, if you know what i mean.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    Globally animal mistreatment is prevalent and overlooked, especially in the farming industry. Factory farms designed to draw maximum output from animals put farm animals through unmistakably horrible treatments

    Do You Really Know Where Your Food Comes From?

    Globally animal mistreatment is prevalent and overlooked, especially in the farming industry. Factory farms designed to draw maximum output from animals put farm animals through unmistakably horrible treatments and hold them in brutal living spaces. Animals are put through...

    Read More
    4 Comments
    • Good Job Ed! I liked how you linked multiple sources in your post. You did a really good job at describing the problem and telling the reader how they can help solve it. I look forward to seeing more posts like this in the future.

    • Dear Ed, I am shocked by your post, “Do You Really Know Where Your Food Comes From?” because Factory Farms are unfair to the animals. i’ve heard about Factory Farms, but i didn’t know it was this bad.

      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Animals are put through these conditions all in the name of profit for factory owners seeking the highest possible profits with little to no regard for the wellbeing of their animals.” I think this is horrifying because the people who own the “farms” are cruel and have no humanity. On the other hand, I wonder what is my role in this cruelty as someone who eats meat.

      Another sentence that stood out is: According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals, “94% of Americans would agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion farm animals raised each year in the U.S. suffer in conditions that consumers would not accept if they could see them.” I like this quote because if we don’t treat animals respectfully through small farms that value life, it won’t last because of the bad quality and people want good quality food. I believe people want their money to be worth what they are paying for: to be good for their health and that their money doesn’t support cruelty.

      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because this post sends a message about seeing whats really happening to animals being abuse.

      • Hi! I have a blog where I discuss more about chicken cruelty and if you’d like some more information, this is the link to my blog: https://saferchickenfarmingblog.wordpress.com/

        I am extremely moved by how you feel affected and how you decided to share your opinion! Your concern for this topic really motivates me to post more and research more on my blog.

    • Ed, I was extremely moved by your posts and how you explained how consumers can help and contribute. I really enjoyed your quotes and references and how you specifically stated some trustworthy labels where we could get safe food and boycott those with animal cruelty. I am also researching this animal cruelty and thanks to you, I have found more information on certain companies that have trustworthy reputations in this field.

      I was able to find that not only were the chickens suffering, but we as consumers were as well. You mentioned the feeding of other animals feces to help them grow and I learned that the chemicals in the feces can affect us, humans, who may consume the meat.

      “Farmers cut costs by feeding animals the remains of other animals, keeping them in extremely small and soiled enclosures, and refusing to provide bedding”. I can now critique the famers with this information that they aren’t feeding the chickens well. I also know that they use certain chemicals in the food but feeding of feces is cruelty on a whole other level. If you would like to help out in this cause, I have a petition and it would mean a lot if you sign. It is to the HHS in the USA and i’m trying to make a differences and decrease this cruelty in chickens used for food.

      Petition: https://www.change.org/p/united-states-department-of-health-and-human-services-healthier-chicken-on-your-dinner-table

      I have also been doing a lot of personal research and if anyone would like to know more, this is the link to my blog: https://saferchickenfarmingblog.wordpress.com/

      Thank you so much Ed, I look forward to reading more blog posts from you.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    In today’s impressionable world, media is more spread and more accessible than it ever has been. This has strong potential to produce different forms of a hive mentality whether it be politically, religiously, o

    To what extent does media control society?

    In today’s impressionable world, media is more spread and more accessible than it ever has been. This has strong potential to produce different forms of a hive mentality whether it be politically, religiously, or even affecting things such as...

    Read More
    1 Comment
    • Ed, nice post! I enjoyed how you presented the information and discussed the psychological effects media has on us. I feel that there are many benefits and downfalls of social media and it seems that you have highlighted some of these too. I think you could expand on this post and elaborate on the psychological effects that media has on the brain. This can be found on http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/12/health/social-media-brain/index.html that elaborates on how the teen brain responds to certain things on social media and the overall effect it has on development.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    In a time of quickly evolving street fashion, new styles and brands emerge everyday, and the individual stylistic possibilities are more expansive than ever before thanks to the modern era’s distribution of i

    What effects do hypebeasts have on streetwear culture?

    In a time of quickly evolving street fashion, new styles and brands emerge everyday, and the individual stylistic possibilities are more expansive than ever before thanks to the modern era’s distribution of information and media, individual senses of style...

    Read More
    2 Comments
    • Ed,
      This is a really cool topic. It is cool to see something written about something that you see in today’s culture of the world. Those companies that are apart of this hypebeast culture are influencing the culture of the youth today. It shows the “cool” ways to dress. I really liked how you wrote this article it was very good.
      Zach Jerome

    • This post is interesting to me Ed because the issues involving hypebeasts and the changes we are seeing today go beyond just the topic on the surface of brand recognition and the changes in fashion, it reaches into a deeper issue of social acceptance within our youth and street culture. This issue also delves into looking at what youth will do for social acceptance and how what is seen as cool to be reached by our youth, with some kids spending everything they have just to be accepted by their peers.

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    As high school senior, I’ve seen and performed my fair share of procrastination throughout high school. Sometimes it’s little assignments, sometimes it’s a paper that decides your grade for the quarter, eithe

    Why is procrastination so prevalent among students?

    As high school senior, I’ve seen and performed my fair share of procrastination throughout high school. Sometimes it’s little assignments, sometimes it’s a paper that decides your grade for the quarter, either way it’s not uncommon to be up...

    Read More
    2 Comments
    • hello! This was very interesting to read, and also incredibly relatable. I am too a senior in high school, and I find myself procrastinating all the time. all the time. I find myself staying up the night before a big test, cramming information into my brain. I too wonder if procrastination is something everybody has always “suffered with,” or if it is just our generation. Possibly because the pressure of school and getting into college has increased, that may have caused our procrastination to increase– just a thought.
      Jessica

    • Dear, Ed
      I agree with you that procrastinating is an issue to teenagers as well as me. One reason I say this is because I know, I procrastinate a lot even my teachers tell me, I’m in my freshman year and I always wait to the last minute and end up sleeping at 1 or 2 in the morning and I end up failing. Procrastinating is extremely relatable to me and I wish it wasn’t an issue for me and I didn’t expected that other people where procrastinating too but now that I have read this I know I’m not the only person going through this issue and it got me really interesting. Thank you for writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next, it really caught my attention and I really like how you share something really relatable to teenagers.
      Sincerely, Karyme <3

  • Profile picture of Ed

    Ed wrote a new post

    I know that depending on global warming trends, rising temperatures will cause difficulties in producing base layers of snow for resort and backcountry skiing. This climate change causes both altered snowfall

    What will Utah skiing be like 50 years from now?

    I know that depending on global warming trends, rising temperatures will cause difficulties in producing base layers of snow for resort and backcountry skiing. This climate change causes both altered snowfall patterns and rising winter temperatures. Artificial snow creation...

    Read More
    4 Comments
    • Ed, I love your article! I feel that a lot of times, news will not cover this topic because there are more pressing issues with global warming, but I feel that it is very important. A lot of people take snow for granted, and lord knows I do since I live in Michigan. Where I live, we did not get a lot of snow last winter and I always wonder if it is because of global warming. I could not imagine having no snow though! That would mean no sledding, skiing, or the like. It would also be a problem monetarily, but maybe because less places would have snow, the places that do would make a lot more money off of snow related activities like the Winter Olympics and casual snow sports? How would you get affected if you no longer had snow where you lived? Thank you for your post.

    • Dear :Ed
      I am pleased with your post, “What will Utah skiing be like 50 years from now?” because I’ve always wanted to go skiing or snowboarding and utah seems like a good place to go once I start traveling. One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “A 2014 New York Times article discusses the effects of lower snowfall on the skiing industry, making the claim that “between 1999 and 2010 low snowfall years have cost the industry $1 billion and up to 27,000 jobs.” I think this is interesting because I didn’t know the amount of snow can mean so much that it can put people out of jobs.Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because I did learn something new reading your post and that was interesting.

    • Ed,
      I really enjoyed reading your post. I am a skier myself and I have never really thought about what it will be like in the future until after reading your post. I really liked the sentence of when you were describing the different numbers that might be able to host the Olympics. That is really crazy to think about how that in the future there might not be a lot of places to ski anymore. I think that if our world starts to get a little bit warmer every year, the skiing places might not be able to have enough of the real snow anymore and will have to use a bunch more fake snow. It’s gonna be different because we won’t be able to have our real snow that we are used to having and I don’t know if more and more people will want to stop skiing because they don’t want to ski on fake snow. What would you do if there was only fake snow available to ski on and no real snow, would you still ski even though there is only fake snow available?

Youth Voices is an open publishing platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.

CC BY-SA 4.0All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

CONTACT US

We welcome new members. You can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending
Missions on Youth Voices
or

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

or

Create Account