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  • celia
  • Okemos, Michigan, USA
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    Celia wrote a new post

    By Celia, Naomi, Alma, and Anna.

    Mental health in schools

    By Celia, Naomi, Alma, and Anna.

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    5 Comments
    • I think that this is a great topic to shed some light on. I love that you have a proposed solution to the problem as well.

    • I really love both this info-graphic and the topic you are highlighting. As someone who deals with a variety of mental illnesses, and experiences how school contributes significantly to these issues, I relate to this topic a lot. I think it’s really important that schools start putting the welfare of their students above grades and test scores. Awesome job and keep up the good work!

    • Wow this is a great info-graphic that clearly shows that there is a problem that needs to be taken care of in today’s schools. The one that really sticks out to me is the one about sleep problems. I think that many kids lives and grades are taking hits because of the problem.

    • The way you designed your info graphic with statistics is very convincing and thought provoking. I believe that less pressure needs to be put on students because they are all dealing with things that people don’t know about.

    • Your info-graphic looks great. I quite like all of the statistics you put in as well as the the section where you put in possible solutions to the problem of mental health in schools.

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    Celia wrote a new post

    When reading Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, my class had many discussions about racism. As a white person, I felt out of place when expressing my opinions. I believe that, because I am white, I should not have a

    Racism and White People

    When reading Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, my class had many discussions about racism. As a white person, I felt out of place when expressing my opinions. I believe that, because I am white, I should not have a say...

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    1 Comment
    • Celia, your piece is well said. I think you have discovered something that not many people today understand, you were able to think about how others might be feeling and realizing that that is bigger than yourself. Being white shouldn’t make you feel embarrassed , and I hope it doesn’t even though some people in the past have been racist it doesn’t mean everyone is. However, I do understand your point about all of us being raised in a society that is racist from the time we are born. Listening to people who are affected by racism is important so we know how to stop it and can try to understand how they may feel. I do also believe that yes they should be talking about what makes them uncomfortable, instead of people who are unaffected by it talking. But, it is important to hear white people’s opinions as well so we all can be on the same page and create change/

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    Celia wrote a new post

    You’ve probably seen a lot of these on here.

     

    “Well, I can tell you it made me all over trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to get it through my head that he WAS most free—and who was to b

    Dialectic Journal

    You've probably seen a lot of these on here.   “Well, I can tell you it made me all over trembly and feverish, too, to hear him, because I begun to get it through my head that he WAS most free—and...

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    1 Comment
    • Hi Celia! I also think that this quote is important in the novel. It shows how Huck Is conflicted about what he has grown up knowing and what he is beginning to learn about Jim. Twain does a really good job of using this conflict in order to comment on the times. Awesome job with this journal entry!

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    Celia wrote a new post

    I’m awful at listening to myself. It’s one of my biggest weaknesses, right next to listening to other people. All my life, I’ve had problems with pushing myself too far or doing things I don’t want to do just be

    Listen to Yourself

    I’m awful at listening to myself. It’s one of my biggest weaknesses, right next to listening to other people. All my life, I’ve had problems with pushing myself too far or doing things I don’t want to do just...

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    Celia and Profile picture of LuxLux are now friends

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    Lux
    @angelraccoon
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    Celia wrote a new post

    Right now, getting involved in politics is more important than ever! On the 21st, women will be meeting across the country, and all will be wearing pink hats with cat ears. I’ve been working on hats to pass out at

    Join The Pussyhat Project!

    Right now, getting involved in politics is more important than ever! On the 21st, women will be meeting across the country, and all will be wearing pink hats with cat ears. I've been working on hats to pass out...

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    1 Comment
    • Dear Celia:

      I am inspired by your post,”Join The Pussycat Project”, because the feminism show in this project. It has shown me how women are the empowered this year because of Trump being the president. Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because of your topic about women empowerment.

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    Celia wrote a new post

    ((This post contains mentions of basically everything triggering))

    If you spend any time on social media, you’ve probably heard of ‘trigger warnings’. Discourse aside, trigger warnings are simply warnings put o

    Why Trigger Warnings Are Important

    ((This post contains mentions of basically everything triggering)) If you spend any time on social media, you’ve probably heard of ‘trigger warnings’. Discourse aside, trigger warnings are simply warnings put on content to prevent someone from looking at something that...

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    14 Comments
    • Very well written. I enjoyed your post and think that you have a very good outlook on this sort of issue. I agree that the world that we live in today constantly tries to hide or mask things that could cause controversy, rather than simply just living and seeing the world for how it is. I use the example all the time of TV rating and how certain language or activity can automatically give it a negative rating or connotation. I think as Americans we need to live in a world that we can see the world as a whole instead of constantly running away from the issue. I think in the modern world people or more opinionated and more easily offended (which is some cases can be a good thing) but I think that instead of blocking out portions of the world we don’t like to simply just see what we want is going to cause major issues later on in society. Good point. Keep writing!

      • Mason,

        Thank you for the comment! Although I didn’t address the political correctness side of the conversation, I agree that it is important to face controversial problems instead of sweeping them under the carpet. Even though I focused on the mental health side of trigger warnings, I might write about your point in the future. In widespread media, there is definitely a warped perception of what is offensive: people shy away from touchy topics but then make an obscene and degrading comment with no shame whatsoever.

        Celia

    • Celia,

      I think this is a very thoughtful post. I have never thought of some of the points that you have made. Trigger warnings are an important part of recovery and I think it is important to keep using them. While some would argue that we are too sensitive, they are an important part of helping people in their paths to recovery.

      • Grace,

        Thank you for your comment! It is so, so important to understand what other people need to live the best life possible. I’m glad that you support the use of trigger warnings.

        Celia

    • Celia,
      I believe that your thesis, so to speak, is the idea that, at least for the mental health side, it is better to allow people to know what they are about to be confronted with, so as to prevent a traumatic experience (correct me if I misunderstood). I have mixed feelings about your assertion, but for the most part agree. I agree with your statement that we should not force individuals into watching something that could cause problems. But, most importantly I agree with your stance that it is about knowing what you are about to see that matters, not the content itself. However, I don’t necessarily think it is the role of the creator to warn a potential audience about triggering content. A lot of work is incredible because of its shock value. In some cases, a trigger warning is a form of censorship. The burden is on the viewer to know if it will trigger them, not the creator. However, if it is easy and will not take away from the artwork, then I see no reason why someone wouldn’t put a trigger warning. We need to be more cautious of what we search.

      • Andrew,

        As someone who visits a modern art museum frequently, I am familiar with the shock value art. I have seen rather disturbing videos and art, and the shock did help convey the artist’s message. A trigger warning could be given to the viewer without exposing what is shocking about the art. My local museum does this for the sake of children, so I was prepared to see something shocking. However, I didn’t have any idea what the art was depicting (it was animal sacrifice). It is the role of people with triggers to figure out where they can and cannot go, horror movies in theaters should’t stop for a second to warn the viewers a jump scare is coming up. People who don’t want to see jump scares shouldn’t go to a horror movie. Thank you for your comment.

        Celia

    • This is a very broad and controversial topic to write about. I agree, in some aspects, that trigger warning can be put in place to protect those who are “at risk” or “harmful”. I agree that it helps us ease into society a little slower, however I disagree that they should be in place everywhere. Life is ever changing, things ebb and flow. We can’t always expect a filter on the “bad” things that happen. I believe that it may be easier for us to progress into a slightly uncensored society when it is given to us piece by piece. Now I’m not saying that we should get completely rid of them, because they are very helpful to protect us, I just believe that it we should know what we’re getting into when using the internet. We should be aware of what’s on there and be cautious of what we look for.

      • Maila,

        I agree that we cannot avoid all the things that make us uncomfortable. There is no reason, however, we should deny someone the right to avoid the things that would trigger a panic response. I agree that people should engage in civil conversations about controversial topics. The lines can be blurred between the two types of content, though. For example, I posted a poem in October about rape culture in high school. Some people would experience unhappiness from reading it, because it may not be something they want to talk about. Other people, namely rape survivors, may feel extreme fear while reading. Everyone has to understand their personal boundaries, and it is our job to respect those boundaries.

        Celia

    • I enjoyed reading your post because it is something you don’t see everyday as a discussion topic. It caught my attention because I have never even heard of trigger warnings before I read your post. I like how you gave specific examples about how a trigger warning on a post could help people avoid being triggered. It also made me think about how others should be more careful about what they post, but if they post it to warn others of the content in the post. Again I really enjoyed reading your post because I learned something new today!

      • Samantha,

        Thank you! I’m glad that I was able to introduce what a trigger warning is to you, because using them makes the internet a safer and more inclusive place.

        Celia

    • This was a good piece because it addresses a very relevant issue that is seldom talked about. Like some other commenters, am unsure if I agree completely with your thesis but I definitely agree with you in the sense that trigger warnings should not be opposed or made fun of. However, I also see the validity in the fact that trigger warnings cannot extend to all areas of life. This was extremely well written and organized. Good work!

    • Dear Celia,
      I 100% agree with you about the trigger warnings and how they should be everywhere cause hey that can help a lot of people that have personal problems. I too see a lot of post on social media that should have a trigger warning but do not and it’s not the best feeling ever to come across this. Honestly like you said more social medias should add a trigger warning so you can easily avoid something you don’t want to see. Also a lot of post on social media kind of make fun of people and their triggered moments and I was wondering if you had any idea is to why someone would do that or think that is funny in any way. Any who I really enjoyed reading your piece and I hope you continue to write.

    • Hello Celia. I can’t say that I’ve ever put so much thought into trigger warnings, but I like what you have to say about them. In this technologically advanced age, it is important that we, as users, look out for one another. I agree that it is vital for social media to have warnings, as not everyone is keen to seeing alarming/violent content. However, as for “real life”, I don’t believe trigger warnings are necessarily beneficial. While one must be aware of the terms and phrases they use and the situation in which they use it, I also believe that it is the responsibility of the person fearing the trigger to decide the situation they put themselves in. Life does not offer warning signs. Life, in all of its splendors, has harsh realities. If one were constantly warned of an upcoming danger, they would cease to live their life in the moment. It is important to focus our attention where we are now, and not project potential “what ifs” into our present reality. That being said, I really did enjoy what you had to say and I agree that in social media, it is essential to have trigger warnings.
      Lily

    • Celia, this is a very good post! As mental illness is becoming less and less taboo, it is super important that people become well learned on how to address mental illness. Speaking to the subject of your discussion, I think that trigger warnings are not always. Speaking personally, I suffer with anxiety and depression, and I would prefer to experience things that are harder for me, so I can learn to make them less hard for me to bear. I can certainly see how people that have more severe connotations would need to shield themselves for things of certain topics (and should be able to), but it doesn’t always help people in a rough spot.

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    Celia wrote a new post

    I like to show my shoulders
    Weird enough, it’s true
    And once or twice a week
    It’s something many girls will do

    Sometimes I show a slit of stomach
    Or most of my thighs
    I rarely see a need to hide
    My skin from

    There's a Problem With Dress Codes - Poem

    I like to show my shoulders Weird enough, it's true And once or twice a week It's something many girls will do Sometimes I show a slit of stomach Or most of my thighs I rarely see a need to hide My skin from prying eyes You'll...

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    32 Comments
    • Hello Celia,
      This poem is really going to stick with me for a long time–sometimes people forget how demeaning it is to women that we have to check ourselves 100% of the time. I am truly terrified. I am terrified to go on dates. I am terrified to get on an elevator, or go into a public restroom when I am by myself. As a petite female who likes to wear sundresses and show off my legs, I find myself in a constant state of stress that I might be ridiculed, harassed or even assaulted. These acts are acts of violence–not “locker room talk” or anything like it. Being touched when you don’t want to be, being ridiculed for wearing clothing you want to wear, or anything of the like needs to be taught to other people now.

      • Robin,
        As a young girl myself, I completely the fear that you face every day. Even though I am not conventionally ‘sexy’, I am still subject to looks from older men. In light of recent events, the “locker room talk” that you mentioned, it is more important than ever to teach boys that girls are not their property.
        thank you for your comment!
        Celia

    • You are addressing a serious problem that we are facing today in our country, and I really like the way that you are bringing it to light. It is not right that a girl should feel uncomfortable in clothes designed to make her feel uncomfortable. The Constitution gives us all the right of freedom of speech- that includes the clothes we wear. Therefore, no one should be ridiculed for how the dress, and girls should definitely not have to “cover up.” If you feel comfortable in your own skin, you have the right to show it. No one should tell you otherwise.

      • Joey,
        You are so right about the free speech. In my school, it is more acceptable for a boy to wear an offensive shirt (see: a half-naked woman covering her breasts with her arms, her face not visible- something that I saw on an 8th grader) than the target shorts I wore as a 6th grader (an age years to young to have any sort of sexual drive). Today is Halloween, and I expect to see a lot of slut shaming tonight, unfortunately.
        Thank you for the comment!
        Celia

    • Hi Celia,
      This is a very relevant and prevalent problem you are addressing in this poem. I enjoyed the format of a poem, it was artistic, non accusatory, but well informative. This is a very real issue, in all middle and high schools, girls adhere and change, so as to not disrupt boys education. This poem is terrific because it addresses the examples in schools, but also goes down to the root of the issue in rape culture. As a female, I too have felt these pressures from a young age.

      In an article by npr, this was stated: ‘ “Don’t humiliate her because she is wearing shorts. It’s hot outside. Instead of shaming girls for their bodies, teach boys that girls are not sexual objects.” ‘
      http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2014/06/12/321268424/the-anatomy-of-a-dress-code
      Good job!

      • Chloe,

        I am always so shocked when I see articles and the like listing off reasons that girls have been dress coded. I believe that not everyone understands how policing what women wear is sexist, and that it is important to explain to people, especially teachers, how to correct their actions.

        Thanks for the comment!
        Celia

    • Hey Celia!
      First of all, i would like to tell you that this was a really nice piece of writing and i am SO glad you chose to speak out about such an important topic. Talking about the “taboo” that surrounds the female body is something that I think we really need to address these days. It’s stupid that girls are taught to cover up or to act a certain way just for fear of guys “not being able to control themselves”, (something i have heard from more conservative family members). I couldn’t agree more with your last statement; this is a small part of a huge problem, that encompasses all genders and societies, and hopefully writing like yours can make this problem known and addressed!

      • Alea,
        It sucks that you have family members who have sexist views. I’m surprised that guys are not offended that everyone thinks that they don’t have a bit of self control around women. I, too, hope that more people will write things like this, as well as take action in other ways.
        Thank you for commenting!
        Celia

    • Hi Celia,
      I think this poem is really great, and I really respect what you are trying to achieve with your writing. I think you have hit the nail on the head with the real issue with violence against young women. Great job with using examples of how girl’s are dress coded for being “immodest” when it is not the responsibility of girls to dress so as not to distract boys etc. Overall, this is amazing, great job.

      • Ellie,
        Thank you so much! You basically summarized everything that I was trying to say through my poem, so I know that I was clear in explaining my point.
        Thank you for your comment!
        Celia

    • I think this is a very creative way of addressing such an important issue in today’s society. I especially like the point you make about how we are not fixing the problem by dressing more conservatively and checking our drinks, but rather pushing it onto someone else. I appreciate the fact that you bring up that clothing is not the issue, but rather the stigma behind it is the problem.

      • Grace,
        As I said on Johanna’s post, if a man wants to rape someone, he will. Rape is never the victim’s fault, no matter what they were wearing. Dress codes are not a solution to rape.
        Thanks for the comment!
        Celia

    • Hi Celia, this poem was fantastic. Not only was it well written, but I agree with the points you made entirely. I have been dress coded in the past and because of that, I was forced to miss my math class that day. It’s ridiculous that girls showing some skin is more important than their education. It’s incredibly frustrating. Thank you for your insightful poem.

      • Cami,
        I remember you telling me about getting dress coded. I can’t believe that teachers will pull girls out of their classes and make parents leave their jobs to bring them new clothes just because the clothes are too ‘sexy’
        Thanks for the comment!
        Celia

    • “Boys will be boys and girls have to accommodate.” -Very true

    • “But all we learn is how to make sure
      He rapes someone else” – this part is so sad yet is so true it truly makes you think about society and what we are teaching the teen age girls of this generation.

      • Johanna,
        Sadly, if a man wants to rape someone, he will rape someone. There is always going to be a girl who isn’t taking every precaution to keep from getting raped. The problem is not the girls not being modest, the problem is the man wanting to rape someone. Anyone who say otherwise is wrong.
        Thanks for the comment!
        Celia

    • Celia,
      I think that this poem is very good, addressing rape culture and dress code/sexism is very important for our society, and something that needs to be talked about more often. Using this topic and turning it into a poem, helps convey mood and why there is something wrong with rape culture. I have experienced this a lot in the past, and still do almost daily.

      • Bella,
        Every day women of all ages and backgrounds feel unsafe. I know that, the older I get, the more I will be surrounded by people who will sexualize me for merely existing. I hope that someday you will be able to exist without feeling objectified.
        Thanks for Commenting!
        Celia

    • Even though I am a male your message hit very close to come. Many of my close friends struggle with these issues on a daily basis. One line that really spoke to me was when you said “We’re taught to check our cups
      For drugs we can’t taste or see”. This line spoke to me because one of my dear friends was date raped. This poem raises awareness and truly shows the hardships women face on a daily basis.

      • Elliot,
        I’m really glad that guys are seeing my post and agreeing. It is important for people to understand that this is not an issue of girls vs. boys. This is an issue that impacts all genders. I’m really sorry about your friend. Rape is such a terrible, unforgivable thing and I hope the problem has been addressed by the time I’m old enough to have children.

    • This is an amazing and relevant poem in our society today. I go to a high school where we wear uniforms, so that, in theory, takes away girls ability to wear “revealing” clothing. We all have to wear shorts, and the girls must be to the knee. It is a common occurrence that girls are sent home for their shorts being too short, while there are boys next to us with shorter shorts than us. It is a very prevalent issue that needs to be addressed.

      • Erin,
        Something that my friends and I have talked about is how hard it is to find girls’ shorts that are knee length. In gym class in middle school, many of the girls had to buy boys’ basketball shorts because we simply couldn’t find shorts long enough in the girls’ section. In middle school (as my high school has a more lenient dress code) I wore skirts just about every day of the spring, because I didn’t feel confident and pretty in any dress code appropriate shorts. “Short-shorts” are just an article of clothing, and schools shouldn’t ban them.
        Thanks for commenting!
        Celia

    • Dear Celia,
      This poem is one of the most powerful things I have ever read. I think everything you talk about is so true ams often times girls are limited by fear of rape ams sexual assault. I think you addressed this in a sensitive ams powerful way. I hope to hear more from you. You are a very talented writer.

      • Danielle,
        Thank you! I plan on continuing posting, and I also hope to see more people talking about this issue.
        Thank you for your comment!
        Celia

    • Celia,
      I was blown away by how you wrote this. It’s so powerful. I agree with how you showed that girls are taught to not tempt a boy instead of boys being taught to simply respect a girl. This is such a huge issue in our world today and not enough people stand up for it to make a real difference. It’s important to face the harsh realities of society so that we can make a change and not have to teach the generations to come what we have wrongfully been taught.

      • Savannah,
        Thank you so much! I agree that this issue is underrepresented, and I hope to see more people in the future take a stand.
        Thank you for commenting!
        Celia

    • Cecilia,
      I love this poem so much. Dress codes are something that really bother me because I often see stories of girls being dress coded even when they were fully covered. It’s so annoying that young girls are told to cover every part of themselves instead of boys being told to not sexual young girls. I like how you tied this problem to rape because while they are not the same I think that they are closely related. If we constantly teach women to be ashamed and teach boys that girl’s and their bodies are the problem we are adding to a society that blames girls for sexual assault. Your poem in very powerful and good job!

    • Dear Celia,

      I really love the poem you have written, you backed it up well with your evidence and I also agree with you on this cause of dress code. It sucks that girls are being discriminated by the way they dress, I feel like girls should be able to wear what they want and not be sent to the principals house for showing her body shape or some skin. There is also a problem where girls who have a nice figure who cannot wear certain things to school because of their nice figure and it will cause a distraction. I feel like this is wrong because you can’t stop guys from looking at a girls body no matter where you go, guys will look. Girls should be able to wear what they want and feel comfortable in their own skin, if you have a nice body, you have a nice body and there is nothing you can do to stop that. As long as you are not being touched in an inappropriate way then there should not be a problem. Hopefully one day there will be a change.

    • Dear Celia:
      I am so impressed by your poem because it is so clearly communicated and honest.
      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is “Is it really up to teenage girls/To stick out their necks/To ask that teachers teach their students/That girls deserve respect?” This stood out for me because I am a teacher, so I am the intended audience for this comment, and it is so well-stated.
      Your poem reminds me of the conversations about dress code that teachers and administration have had at my school. A number of us spoke out against the dress code because, just as you so eloquently explain, it primarily targets girls. The issue is largely resolved at our school now, but honestly, I can imagine using your poem as evidence if I ever needed to argue against dress codes again.
      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write because you are such a clear, well-spoken advocate for any community to which you belong. You use language powerfully for an important cause here.

    • I’m always shocked when I see posts and young girls listing off reasons that they have been dress coded. I think that not everyone understands how telling young girls and what women, in general, should wear is sexist, but that they should be educated on this topic. Women should be able to express themselves just as boys are allowed to at school without being dress coded or shamed for being proud of who they are.

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    Celia wrote a new post

    There are many problems facing America today, and many threaten the lives of citizens. I believe that one of the most pressing issues is gun control. In many states, it is easy to obtain guns, easier than it is to

    Gun Control In America

    There are many problems facing America today, and many threaten the lives of citizens. I believe that one of the most pressing issues is gun control. In many states, it is easy to obtain guns, easier than it is...

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    5 Comments
    • Taking away guns is not the answer, just like drugs which are illegal you can obtain whenever. The fact that only 3% of legal gun owners will actually commit a crime with a gun makes me wonder why take the good citizens of Americas guns away. If you are found with an illegal firearm there should be harsher punishment. Many people use these guns to help defend against home intruders and criminal looking to harm you.

    • I think the total removal of guns is not what we need, but universal background checks, psychology checks, and generally just making it harder to simply obtain a gun

    • Yes, because taking guns away from law abiding citizens is differently the answer. You don’t need to protect your self and your family. Just put up a sign saying “Gun free zone” and criminals will have to follow it because it is the law. Way to go, you just made america a much more dangerous place.

    • I believe that taking away guns or boosting gun laws with cause issues. Guns are part of American history and American lifestyle, and by taking these away will irritate the Americans that really care for there guns. I believe that the solution for this is, is greater education for people in America and to educate people on guns and the danger of guns instead of treating them like taboo.

    • I understand what you are saying and in a perfect world just taking all the guns away would be the best idea. However that really isn’t an option. 32% of all known guns in America are illegal or non-registered. Taking away all the guns would just mean the ones we know about. That means we would take away that other 68% of guns that are legal leaving the people that owned them legally unable to protect themselves against that 32% of guns that we can’t take away.

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