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    Averi wrote a new post

    Desdemona

    1.3.208-218

    My noble father,

    I do perceive here a divided duty:

    To you I am bound for life and education;

    My life and education both do learn me

    How to respect you; you are the lord of duty;

    I am

    Analysis of Othello

    Desdemona 1.3.208-218 My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty: To you I am bound for life and education; My life and education both do learn me How to respect you; you are the lord of duty; I am hitherto your daughter: but...

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    Sub-minimum wage is legal on behalf of employing disabled workers because, “For thousands of people with the most significant disabilities, it means the difference between reaching their full employment po

    Contrary to my Beliefs: "The other Side."

    Sub-minimum wage is legal on behalf of employing disabled workers because, “For thousands of people with the most significant disabilities, it means the difference between reaching their full employment potential and having no job at all,” wrote Jim Gibbons, the...

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    2 Comments
    • Averi,
      I think this is really interesting. I had never heard of sub minimum wage before right now, but I think it seems to be a good idea. If it provides work opportunities I think it’s brilliant, and I think it’s a good way to keep people involved regardless of what they are and are not able to do.

    • Averi,
      This topic is one that I personally have experienced because my aunt had a disability and was paid sub-minimum wage. The cool thing about her situation is that she did not care about the amount of money she made, she just loved helping people and contributing to a work environment. Because of this, her employer was able to pay her less so that they could pay full time workers more. I really like the insight that you brought from this post and this topic is very interesting. Below I have included a link that could be of your interest.

      Many People With Disabilities Are Being Paid Way Below the Minimum Wage, and It’s Perfectly Legal

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    Megan Whatcott, who works with me at Hillcrest Care Center, a home for disabled adults, has a story I believe many people could find intriguing. On November 15, 2011, Megan and her friend, Jolley Gulch, went rock

    I asked, "How are you alive?"

    Megan Whatcott, who works with me at Hillcrest Care Center, a home for disabled adults, has a story I believe many people could find intriguing. On November 15, 2011, Megan and her friend, Jolley Gulch, went rock repelling at Zion...

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    2 Comments
    • Averi, this was a greatly written piece. Your use of descriptive words provides imagery for the reader. I could see the steepness of the drop, and how far up it was. I like how you directly quoted what Megan said to you. It gives the writing a narrative feel, and makes the reader feel a part of the story. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/09/survival-stories_n_5042718.html You should read this article about the top ten survival stories. I think it would be interesting to see if they blame their survival on their spirituality like Megan did, or if they think it was just good fortune.

    • Averi, I really enjoyed reading your post. It has really vivid imagery that completely captured my attention. I really liked how you incorporated what Megan’s quotes. I would love to have more background on Megan as well. Was she always spiritual? Did this experience make her a more spiritual person? Here is an article I think you’ll find interesting: http://www.history.co.uk/shows/alone/articles/famous-real-life-survival-stories

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    The United States has the highest rate of mass shootings in the entire world, which is why I don’t understand how we can stand here and accuse other countries of being terrorists. “The United States takes up 5% of

    Walk out Today, For a Safer Tomorrow

    The United States has the highest rate of mass shootings in the entire world, which is why I don't understand how we can stand here and accuse other countries of being terrorists. "The United States takes up 5% of...

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    6 Comments
    • Averi-
      Thank you for writing this. This topic seems to be talked about constantly, especially after the Parkland shooting. Like you, I am frustrated. I am confused as to how this keeps happening and why there hasn’t been a substantial amount of change. As a student, there is an ever impending sense of fear instilled in my mind- What if a shooter comes into school? What if someone I love is shot? When is the next shooting going to happen?. Unfortunately, shootings are starting to seem ‘normal’. I think change is necessary and long over due. While I hope to see governmental action, the school walk out signifies that something is changing- and I’m here for it. If you’re interested, I found this article that talks about how ‘thoughts and prayers’ are not enough: https://www.shes-it.com/human-rights-we-dont-need-thoughts-and-prayers-anymore/

    • Averi,
      I think this post is really interesting. I agree, I think there’s a huge problem in the language we use, as a nation, to address people born in the USA who commit acts of terror. People in positions of authority are quick to call people from other countries terrorists, especially branding people from Middle Eastern Countries, but when an act of terror is committed in the US, like the school shooting that recently took place or say, the Las Vegas shooting, the language isn’t terrorist. The language used is “mentally disturbed,” or “terrible person.” The mind set about the word terrorist needs to shift from someone outside the country, especially the mind set around people from The Middle East, because the fact is that terrorist attacks happen in the US, and they happen by people who’s families have lived in the US for generation upon generation.
      I think schools walking out in March is a brilliant idea, because it’s a peaceful way of protesting, and if enough people are involved the media and people in positions of power are going to have to at least recognize that there’s a huge problem, even if they choose to ignore it. People’s voices need to be heard especially on topics like this.

    • Hi Averi,
      The worst thing we can do is having these people continue to have the ability to come into our schools. There needs to be a place for guns in society in america because a full on ban would not be effective but schools and cities are not the place. It’s not an issue of rights its an issue of trying to protect our people. there needs to be protections for those who need it. The laws need to change and putting pressure on lawmakers is the way to do it.

    • Averi,
      I am so glad your wrote on the topic of gun control because it is a big issue and is prevalent. I agree with you when you emphasized on the point where we need to protect our own people and educate them. After the Parkland shooting, many people our age have been speaking out against the issue of gun violence. I think this is our time to make a difference in our world and even if it’s making posters because the little things add up. I recently found this video of a student from Parkland and thought it was inspiring: https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2018/02/17/parkland-florida-student-emma-gonzalez-anti-gun-rally-fort-lauderdale-full.cnn Let me know what you think and thanks for writing!

    • It is unbelievable that there have been over 200 school shootings nationwide in the US! Averi, I am so happy that you chose to write about this because obviously there needs to be more discussion about gun violence. I cannot believe that there has been no change even though hundreds of people died, and numerous CHILDREN died without their parents for no reason. This issue is one of the main reasons I am losing my hope, confidence, and love for this nation. I specifically love your second paragraph, and how you started it with “A school shooting is an act of terror, yet, we still count how many lives that makes this time, and then hope for the best, without making any political change!” That statement is so strong and so important and I wish our government was smart enough to make change for the better. I found an interesting article about a “gun control moment” in America right now that discusses how congress and the government is under pressure with the Florida/school shootings issue. Here it is: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/25/us/politics/gun-control-congress-governors.html Thank you for keeping this a relevant topic and sharing!

    • I was just reading this when I got the idea to see if someone had written about gun control on youthvoices.live. I feel so lucky to have found your post!

      “A school shooting is an act of terror, yet, we still count how many lives that makes this time, and then hope for the best, without making any political change!” This is the sort of realness I think a lot of news sources have been missing. There’s this weird desire to stay neutral, but this isn’t really a neutral subject like a water line or zoning. Being outraged at there having been 200 shootings is perfectly natural, and the idea that we have to reach some outrageous number before people recognize that is ridiculous. There needs to be more overt discussion about this. This isn’t a party issue, it’s a bipartisan issue. To many of our lawmakers are afraid of the NRA. The power the SuperPAC is outrageous, especially when children have been the center of most of the attacks. The power of greed in out capitalist system is insane.
      If you want to find more about how people are currently covering gun control, why not check out the article I was reading? If you’re really passionate about this, you might find it interesting.

  • Thomas,
    Yes! Writing is a personal outlet, and even a data log for humanity’s experience. Throughout history scribes, and now what we call journalists have always been prevalent in society. Which is why I worry that people would choose to say ‘journalism is a dying craft.’ Because writing is critical for social analysis, and self-reflection.

    I…Read More

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