• I love your post so much. I’ve been looking up lots of information on LGBT+ homelessness lately and it is so sad. Like you said these people need support because sometimes their own families throw them out. I couldn’t imagine kicking my child out knowing they don’t have a place to go just because of their sexuality. Like, did you know that 40% of…[Read more]

  • Here at Out of the Closet into the Home we focus on LGBT+ youth who have become homeless due to their identity. Of the 7% of youth in America that are homeless, 40% of them are homeless due to their sexuality and

  • Aurora commented on the post, My Coming Out 2 weeks, 1 day ago

    I love this coming out story because you’ve really highlighted how it feels coming out when you have conflicting aspects of your life such as religion. Sometimes like in your case it is very against the grain from what people tell you things are supposed to be and that can be really alienating. I’m so happy you’ve been able to accept who you are…[Read more]

  • Dear past-self,

    I’m sorry you feel the way you do right now, but everything will be fine. I’d like to tell you how it went, felt, and worked out. From when I am sending this letter to you from you are very happy

    • This is really beautiful. “Let them love the real you.” I think some non-LGBTQ+ people might not understand how important this is, not only to a family but to an individual’s mental health. It feels awful to hide who you are, and nobody should have to. Overall, I’m really happy everything worked out so well for you! It makes me feel optimistic for future LGBTQ+ youth.

  • Dear Jos,
    Hi I’m Aurora, the author of this post, I just wanted to thank you for your thoughtful and kind response. Isn’t it crazy how different a response to a secret can be from what you expected. Like for me trust is what it boiled down to for my mom. She was really only upset because, to her, it seemed like I didn’t trust her enough to tell…[Read more]

  • Hello Alison, I’m so happy you enjoyed my story and I truly appreciate you’re kind words! Coming out is a really personal thing and it doesn’t always go as easy as it did for me. When I was thinking and working up my own bravery to come out I feel like I always knew in the back of my mind it would all be okay in the end and that the likelihood was…[Read more]

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    Transcript:

    I didn’t have the most exciting coming out story, because a lot of my friends and family were really open minded. So I guess I’ll talk a little about coming out. You know it’s a very person

    • Dear Aurora,
      I am so moved and so happy you decided to write and publish this story! It fills me with joy to know that you have had the fearlessness to come out ! I have so many friends who have the desire to come out but don’t want to because they are scared. Reading this post made me feel such beautiful and positive vibes from you. You are such a wonderful person and I’m so glad you’re embracing who you are. Coming out is such a hard thing to do, and in some cases like you mentioned, a very sensitive topic. Thank you so much for sharing your story with everyone. I look forward to read many more of your other posts !

      Sincerely,
      Alison <3

      • Hello Alison, I’m so happy you enjoyed my story and I truly appreciate you’re kind words! Coming out is a really personal thing and it doesn’t always go as easy as it did for me. When I was thinking and working up my own bravery to come out I feel like I always knew in the back of my mind it would all be okay in the end and that the likelihood was my family would accept me. For your friends that may not be the case, it doesn’t always go really well. Its only a matter of time until your friends will be able to come out and that is completely fine, sometimes the timing is very important. It can be extremely scary even when you are certain whoever you are telling will accept you. There’s always a sense of “what if,” that lurks in your mind. The fact that they have come out to you is such a great first step and speaks a lot about how great of a friend you are to them! If you are interested (and you may be doing this already) I encourage you, and your friends, to complete my peers and Is’ “playlist” on LRNG called Coming Out. The resources there sound like they could be interesting for you and could help your friends as well.

    • Dear Jos,
      Hi I’m Aurora, the author of this post, I just wanted to thank you for your thoughtful and kind response. Isn’t it crazy how different a response to a secret can be from what you expected. Like for me trust is what it boiled down to for my mom. She was really only upset because, to her, it seemed like I didn’t trust her enough to tell her right away. I actually remember feeling like I would have felt the same way about telling her I had a boyfriend and when I told her that I think I made the situation worse, oops. In the end now she pokes fun about it sometimes which I’m happy about because it means its in the past. I hope your family hasn’t held a grudge. It seems like this experience for me is very similar to your experience with your secret. For trusting families, like ours, it seems we both think “what is the average/expected response to my secret?” and completely forget about all the layers that affect how people respond. In any case, thank you again your story really got me thinking about coming out in secrets in a way I haven’t in the past.

    • Dear Aurora :

      I am intrigued by your coming out story because I have never really heard one before. I am a straight female and all my friends are relatively straight and haven’t had to do this before so I never knew how it goes for people. Yours was very intriguing because I could feel your emotion, fear, and excitement behind the different ways you decided to tell your family and friends.

      One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “But, anyway, after that some time went by and she asked me out, not once, not twice, but three times.” I think this is amazing because normally your best friends are meant to be your partners. Whether they were your best friend prior to the feelings being caught or you made them your best friend for that reason, those are still the best relationships.

      Another sentence that I grabbed my attention was: “I grew up in a very conservative part of New Jersey and went to a religious school when I was young before switching to public schools. In any case I didn’t really realize they way I felt for a long time I think I was about 16 when I realized I was pansexual.” This stood out for me because even though you grew up in a very conservative town and went to a conservative school you still were able to realize who you were and accept it. You also made others accept it too and thats extremely hard to do when you find yourself outside of the norm.

      Your story reminds me of something that happened to me. One time I had to explain to my parents that I wasn’t the student they thought I was. They thought that I was extremely smart and every grade I brought home was a B or higher. I was actually a C student with a best friend who brought home all As. After telling them I don’t do as good as they believed, I spent the next 3 years being compared to her and having them tell me how they wish I could be like her. Your story ended with your parents being supportive right away, I’m still working on mine. Even though they aren’t similar in context they are similar overall. Everyone has to tell their parents something they feel they won’t like at some point in their lives, and we all have to live with the results.

      Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because your story was inspiring and so are you. You made such a difficult task an easy one and Im sure others that hear your story will look up to you and your courage.

    • Hello Aurora, I am really glad that you shared your story with us as I had a similar experience when I came out as pansexual as well. Even though I knew that my mom was accepting, I was still terrified to tell her, but when I did, she was completely accepting, although a little confused. Coming out is hard to do, no matter how accepting your friends and family might be because we all have that lurking “what if” on our minds. Thank you for writing this!

    • Hello Aurora,

      Firstly, thanks for sharing! This can be super difficult, especially when you’re vulnerable, like on the internet. Nonetheless, your courage to demonstrate yourself to the world is awesome, and I want to congratulate you for that. It’s so unfortunate that many people don’t have an easy-going experience when they come out, and it has even led to disowning of children and hate that has lasted for years after years. The people in my life that have come out as a member of the LGBTQ+ community have been fortunate enough to be met with kindness and support, but not everyone here has been so lucky. We had an attorney come to our school last year and he talked about a girl he represented in a landmark court case. He said that when she came out as gay, her parents sent her to an institution that basically tortured her, putting rocks in a backpack and making her stand in a room with it on for hours, playing music so she could not sleep, things of that nature. It’s disgusting how we as a species can’t support each other on things as trivial as to whom we are attracted. Nonetheless, I am very glad to hear that your experience was not so volatile and dangerous.

      Hunter

  • It really is sad how people use religion, which teaches love and acceptance, to justify hate. It makes very little sense to me. You raise a lot a good points in your piece for example we do need to hold people accountable. There shouldn’t be this ability to use religion as a blanket excuse to be hateful to any group. I feel like those who hate…[Read more]

  • Dear Leaders of America,

    I realize that it is hard to take strong stances sometimes especially on heated subjects. However, this occurrence and this issue should not be this way your stances should be firm and

    • Hello, Aurora!

      I think that most people would (and should) agree with your letter.
      The first two sentences did a really nice job introducing your letter. They stood out for me because I think that we can directly relate these two sentences to the POTUS. After Charlottesville, Trump neglected to take a strong and clear stance. I think that this was what he felt safe with because it protected him from criticizing his base support group. However, he was largely criticized by many other leaders and the public because he did not denounce hate groups that have the ability and the want to cause trouble or dangerous situations for anyone that they do not respect.
      If POTUS will not take a strong, firm, and clear position on issues that disrupt our country’s strive for harmony, then we must look to other leaders.

    • Hey Aurora,

      This letter spoke to me in so many ways. As a African-American female I have several concerns and fears for this country and I feel as though you spoke on the issues very well. It does not matter what our individual beliefs are, as a country I believe we should all be able to come together and agree this tragedy is far from right. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Freedom of speech needs to be understood as the right of SAYING what you want instead of DOING what you want to each other. On top of that, the individuals that are supposed to be the leaders of America is having obvious troubles with leading by example, so who are we supposed to look up to for actual leadership? I, personally, just want justice and people that have this country’s best interest in mind.

    • Love Love Love what you said.You spoke with power and you spoke bny heart. I totally agree with what you said because I feel the same. I know that it’s freedom of speech but it shouldn’t because it hurts us.

  • Aurora‘s profile was updated 2 months, 4 weeks ago

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