These are some of my thoughts on the first part of “The Hate U Give.” You can see all of my comments on this part of the novel on NowComment.

Paragraph 182 of “The Hate U Give” by Angie Thomas might leave a reader feeling upset because the character Khalil was just shot and killed for no good reason. Here’s the description: “One. Khalil’s body jerks. Blood splatters from his back. He holds on to the door to keep himself upright.” This is upsetting because he was just shot and killed in cold blood 

So far, the injustice and discrimination in “The Hate U Give” might remind a reader of a story in the news. This man named Walter Wallace who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder was walking towards police with a knife. Instead of the officers diffusing the situation and trying to help Mr. Wallace, they immediately pointed their guns at him and started firing when he failed to put the knife down after being told to do so. A man in a mental crisis cannot just easily obey orders. Instead of trying to help him they shot and killed him.

After this part of the book, most readers probably will not be looking forward to reading the rest of this book because it already started off with an unjustified murder. What’s probably going to happen next is they’ll probably begin to protest and riot in the name of justice in order for the officer who committed the act to be sentenced to jail.

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May 8, 2021 6:04 pm

Dear Brendaly:
I am moved by your post on The Hate U Give and racial injustice because it so powerfully connected the text to issues happening in the real world. It’s clear why everyone should read this book–it stands to transform their understanding of social justice. One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “What’s probably going to happen next is they’ll probably begin to protest and riot in the name of justice in order for the officer who committed the act to be sentenced to jail.” I think this is at once optimistic and encouraging because you see hope in the book’s potential to change others’ perspectives on race in America, and to lead them to advocate for change.
Another sentence that spoke to me was: “A man in a mental crisis cannot just easily obey orders..” This stood out for me because, all too often, we fail to recognize the difference between what someone is going through and what they are trying to do; just as in this case, the police misunderstood what was happening, with tragic consequences. Have you read the book Concrete Rose? I thought you might be interested in this because it tells the story of Starr’s father. Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because you have a very importance voice to share!

Olga Molina
Olga Molina
May 8, 2021 5:12 pm

.Dear Brendaly:
I  like how you are able to compare the story to real life events. I see the connection you are making and also how difficult this might be as one might feel hurtful with everything that we hear and see in the news lately.

Erin
Erin
May 8, 2021 5:05 pm

Dear Brendaly:
I am intrigued with your post, “Injustice,” because it discusses one of the hardest parts of the book and connects to what is happening in our current state. I want to acknowledge how well you connected the situation to a real account. I hope that your post is seen by many, and people do continue to read the entire book to see how it ends.
Thank you for your post!

Joe Bellacero
May 8, 2021 5:00 pm

One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “After this part of the book, most readers probably will not be looking forward to reading the rest of this book” I think this is perceptive because we live surrounded by so much pain and injustice, that sometimes when we see it coming in a book we just want to avoid it. Yet, we know that sometimes you have to face these things if you want to grow as a person, and it is easier to face them in a book than in real life.

Ms. W
Ms. W
May 8, 2021 4:58 pm

I like how you make the comparison to the real world. If you think about it, there are many stories in the headlines that can connect to Thomas’ book. I think the way she expresses the senselessness of his death is an important moment for readers to take a minute and let sink in. Your presentation is well done.

Lexie
November 9, 2020 4:00 pm

Brendaly,
I really liked the way you compare the two incidents, one in a book the other in the street. I can definitely see the connection!

November 9, 2020 3:55 pm

I agree with the connection made between the novel and the Wallace case. Many of the officers that were involved should have the training to deal with a mental illness case that would have bettered the situation and should take responsibility for what happened. Many of the events that happen in the novel can relate to many of the injustices that go on today even protests and riots.

Melissa
November 9, 2020 3:39 pm

Dear Brendaly,

I am impressed by your post, “Injustice” because it is a very controversial topic at the moment. Many people have different opinions about this but I am glad that you are spreading awareness.

One sentence that stood out to me is: “This man named Walter Wallace who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder was walking towards police with a knife.” I think this is crazy because there are people who are diagnosed with disorders may not know how to properly react in situations.

Thank you for your writing. I look forward to seeing what else you write about and the importance in this world.

Melissa

Estefani
November 6, 2020 2:48 pm

Dear Brendaly,

I am very impressed with your post ”Injustice” because it is a topic that not everyone wants to be talking about. Because in the book ”The Hate U Give” By Angie Thomas, what is happening in the world with the people of color is the same as in the book.

One sentence you wrote that caught my attention was ”This man named Walter Wallace, who diagnosed with bipolar disorder was walking towards the police with a knife”.

Another sentence caught my attention was ”Khalil’s body shakes, blood splatters down his back and he grabs the door upright”.

Thanks for your writing. I hope to see what you write soon I really liked your article. From the book ”The Hate U Give” By Angie Thomas.

Steven
November 3, 2020 6:20 pm

Dear Brendaly,

I like how you show what people around the world should be acting like this, and treating people right.

Youth Voices is an open publishing platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

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