Make your own Google Docs copy of this guide after you click on this link. Or copy the text below and paste it into a Word or Google document.

On your copy, work on one paragraph at a time. Read through the whole paragraph, then replace what’s in the <red angle brackets> with your own thoughts and details. Notice that there are links in purple to these four lists:  99 Adjectives to Describe Any Book Emotions Color Wheel | Sample Character Traits | Literary Device, Technique or Element.


For my monologue project, I selected lines from one of the most <Click this link and choose an adjective to describe literature> scenes from <Playwright’s Name>’s play, “<Title of Play>.” I chose to learn Act <#>, Scene <#>, lines <##><##> as my monologue because <explain what this monologue makes clear about one of the characters.>

The monologue consists of <the main character / a minor character / the protagonist /  the antagonist… >, <Name of the Character> speaking to <another character / other characters> about what is <troubling / infuriating / delighting / scaring / inspiring / confusing / upsetting… > <him /her / them>. This monologue is heard by <describe who heard these words in the play.> The monologue takes place in <Where does the monologue happen?>. This is important because <explain what makes this place significant>, and this makes <Name of Character in the monologue> feel <Click this link and choose a strong adjective describing emotions>

The main conflict in this scene would most likely be <describe the big idea, or the general, philosophical, psychological, ethical, political, religious… point that the playwright is making in this monologue and scene.> I say this because of <describe the way his character has been acting in play up to the point of the monologue>. <Name of Character in the monologue> starts to feel <Click this link and choose a strong adjective describing emotions–different from the one a few sentences above> for what <he / she> has done. This is part of a pattern for <Name of Character> where <describe more things that happened to this character and how this fits what, in general, is happening to the character.> Over time this builds up to be a <main / minor> conflict in the story of <Name of Character in the monologue>.

In the scene where this monologue occurs, <Name of Character> is quite a <Click this link and choose an adjective showing a character trait>> character. This is especially true after <describe a turning point in this scene>. <Name of Character> becomes <Click this link and choose more specific adjective showing another character trait> and <Click again and choose a third adjective showing another character trait>. This seems <contradictory to / consistent with> <his / her> previous state of mind earlier in the play. 

In the monologue, words like “<copy words from the monologue>,” as well as the word choice in the sentence “<copy a sentence from the monologue>” reflect that <Name of Character> is committed to <describe, with some detail, exactly what this character is obsessed with doing, as reflected in the words and sentences you quoted>. The words “<Copy another phrase from the monologue here.>” represents the feeling of <Click this link to choose an adjective showing a character trait> that <Name of Character> is experiencing after <describe an action the character has taken> contributing to <his / her > overall <describe the character’s mental, psychological, spiritual, philosophical, emotional… mental state at this point, in this scene in the play.>

If it was up to me to stage this scene, I would most likely make the actors playing <Character or characters in the scene> <stand, sit, walk…> in a <describe the place> in order to set the mood of <What feelings do you want your viewers to see>. This might represent <Character in the monologue>‘s feelings of <Click this link and choose an adjective showing a character trait> after <he / she> realizes that <describe what this character seems to understand at this point in the play or in this scene>. I would also add some props to the scene, for <Name of Character> to perhaps <describe what he / she might do with the props> in order to show <Click this link to choose another adjective showing a character trait> after <he / she> <describe an important event that makes him / her feel this way>. If I were to direct the actors, then I would most likely encourage <Character’s Name> to be a bit <Click this link and choose another adjective showing a character trait>, and give off a feeling of being <Click this link and choose a strong adjective describing emotions> in an effort to make his character believable.

In this monologue, <Playwright’s Name> used certain poetic elements to enhance the emotion being portrayed in the scene. As I mentioned before, the main theme in this scene would be the <describe the big idea, or the general, philosophical, psychological, ethical, political, religious… point that the playwright is making in this monologue and scene.> and the use of poetic elements really reinforces the impact of <Name of Character>‘s emotions. For example, <Playwright> used <Click this link and choose a literary device, technique, or element> as a feature in his writing to provide <describe the effect of the literary element you have identified>, as well as <describe another effect of the literary element.>

All in all, the monologue in Act <#>, Scene <#> is a prime example of an effective piece of writing by <Playwright’s Name> that <summarize some of the points you have made above about why this monologue is effective and how it impacts readers.>

Author

Youth Voices is an open publishing and social networking platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.  See more About Youth VoicesTerms of ServicePrivacy Policy.All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

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