Now that I’ve made a <map, family tree, diagram, illustration, collage, model, toy… > about <Title of Chapter/Book/Story>, by <Author’s First and Last Name>, I am noticing that… <Complete this paragraph with a few more sentences that describe what the text is about>.

This might leave a reader feeling <strong adjective>, because <Explain what it is in the text that might bring that response.> An example of this is on page <___>.  “<Copy a couple of lines or a paragraph from the book.>

The issues that keep coming up are… <list a couple of issues, and explain>. You can see this on page <_____> where it says: “<Copy another 2 or 3 sentences or a paragraph from the book>.”  The theme here is <consider one of these>.  I mean, what’s at stake in this <chapter, book, story> is…

In the first paragraph of <Title of Chapter/Book/Story>, by <Author’s First and Last Name>, writes: “<Copy a couple of lines or a paragraph from the book.>” By the end of the <chapter, book, story> you can see that what <he/she> means is that…<Finish this paragraph with two or more sentences, explaining the theme of the text you have been reading.>

I’d love to know what you think of my <map, family tree, diagram, illustration, collage, model, toy… >

CC BY-SA 4.0 Noticing After Making by Paul is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Youth Voices is an open publishing platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.

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