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Education reform is an important aspect in our world today. Its main goal is to change public education in terms of educational theory and practice, and therefore, enhance it. Education reform focuses on the output of student success and achievement.  It creates a higher curriculum efficiency, professional development, and stronger state standards.

Furthermore, education reform needs to be applied more in the United States because a study done by CBS showed that, “on average, only 37% of the curriculum in school is used in everyday life, and that the rest of the information is forgotten and never used” (“Americans Use Just 37 Percent Of Information Learned In School, Survey Finds”). Another separate study that drew from Professor David Perkins, a lifelong teacher, stated that on average, he believed that 90% of what they teach their students will never be used in their lives and they are wasting their time (“Americans Use Just 37 Percent Of Information Learned In School, Survey Finds”). Therefore, subjects that power a sense of innovation and lead to new ideas are needed. 

Because of these studies, we need to incorporate a new way of learning and thinking called STEM learning. STEM is a program that stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Workers in those fields play a key role in the sustained growth and stability of the U.S. economy, and are a critical component to helping the U.S. win the future. STEM education creates critical thinkers, increases science literacy, and enables the next generation of innovators (Perkins). It is a new way of thinking and learning that needs to be more widespread across the U.S. Overall, STEM learning encourages knowledge, adaptation, and teaches problem solving. #RHS

Works Cited 

Americans Use Just 37 Percent Of Information Learned In School, Survey Finds. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2021, from https://www.google.com/amp/s/philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2019/01/26/americans-use-just-37-percent-of-information-learned-in-school-survey-finds/amp/

Professor David Perkins: What’s worth learning? (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2021, from https://www.futurelearn.com/info/courses/learning-teaching-university/0/steps/26394

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February 23, 2021 12:58 am

Hi Peyton! I thought your article was extremely interesting. The fact that only 37% of the curriculum that we see in school is seen in our everyday lives. This is interesting because in class I feel that it was always common that a student asked when we would ever use what we were learning in real life. The teacher that gets asked the question always seems to get upset, but you just proved the validity of that point. I believe that if we see a change in our education system, students will be more willing to learn and remember material rather than just memorizing the information for the test and then forgetting about it.

February 22, 2021 5:36 pm

Peyton, I think your article is super interesting. It is something that should be brought up more in schools. I agree when you said that we should “enhance” it and that most of the information students end up learning is later forgotten. I also enjoyed how you brought up an alternative way for students to learn. STEM learning is known to be more effective, but there should also be another form of leaning for students interested in art. Your article was easy to follow as well. Great job!

February 22, 2021 5:40 am

Peyton,
I really liked your post! I think that it was very interesting that “he believed that 90% of what they teach their students will never be used in their lives and they are wasting their time.” I thought this was so interesting because this is coming from a teacher’s perspective. I also think that this becomes more true the older a student gets. I believe that younger kids should learn about all the subjects in order to find out what they are most interested in. However, I feel like if one student wants to go into a heavily English focused career, they should not be forced to study science in depth. I also think this would lead to more students enjoying school and would give opportunities to teach life skills to students. For example, many students do not know how to write a check or cook basic meals.

February 22, 2021 4:27 am

Peyton,

I really enjoyed reading your thoughts and research in education reform. I totally agree with your fact that, “ on average, only 37% of the curriculum in school is used in everyday life, and that the rest of the information is forgotten and never used” which needs to be changed. I also believe that incorporating STEM into our daily educational lives is important. We need more hands on learning and overall become more in depth with STEM and its aspects. Overall, I liked how you provided information and your own thoughts to tie it all together.

February 21, 2021 3:45 pm

Peyton, I liked your article about education reform. I found it very interesting when you said, “ only 37% of the curriculum in school is used in everyday life, and that the rest of the information is forgotten and never used” and “ subjects that power a sense of innovation and lead to new ideas are needed.” I was very surprised to find out that such a small percentage of what we learn in school is seen as useful in everyday life. In addition, I liked how you said that new subjects need to be added and a possible solution to that is the STEM program.

Youth Voices is an open publishing platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

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