Will teaching children to code in early educational settings have a positive impact on students’ education performance? People usually say that children are very young to learn to code. They might agree that coding is complicated for children and a  very difficult task from which they would not benefit. But when young children are exposed to coding in the classrooms, this promotes and supports children’s inquiry development. Does this mean educators should implement coding as part of the children’s learning curriculum? I believe learning and teaching how to code will help students to achieve their educational success. Therefore, educators must be prepared to support students with the appropriate materials to make this learning experience enjoyable.

When coding is introduced and implemented in the classrooms, children could develop their critical thinking,  and also gain confidence in their problem-solving abilities. Does coding only support students’ computational development? Teaching children to code is an important skill that children should learn because it provides opportunities for young learners to grow and expand their knowledge in different academic subjects such as math, writing, reading, and other skills, which are valuable in life. In addition, coding encourages children to be creative. This makes me think that in educational school settings, children should be engaged and learn to code. Children learn a lot through play and, with a program such as Scratch, they would have fun and learn. For instance, a coding program as Scratch allows children to learn different skills that will improve their performance while they are learning to code. In addition, educators can take advantage of this program because they can create lessons that involve students working in collaboration with their peers. Also, educators would be able to learn more about their students because they can create projects in which they would share their culture and personal interests.

Should more schools embrace Scratch as part of students’ learning and academic success? I believe programs such as Scratch should be incorporated into the curriculum because this program will help students to have a better understanding of different academic areas, and also reach a maximum learning potential.

Students could find this project fun, also it gives the opportunity to be unique creating their own project. 

I feel good because I could pause it and repeat it as many times as I wanted. Also, having a step-by-step instruction for something that I have never done before it feel excites me because I did not feel lost.

My Scratch Program tells where I came from. what I love and enjoy. Also, it tells about my family composition.  I spent a lot of hours creating this short program but I really enjoyed it. I learned that you can draw your own sprite, add sound, and upload your own backgrounds.

image_pdfimage_print

Author

Tags:
0 0 votes
Rate This Post
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
4 Comments
Newest
Oldest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Aniya
August 23, 2021 6:33 pm

Dear Laura:
I am intrigued by your post, “Coding for Children,” because many might believe that coding may be too farfetched for younger children to engage in. Nevertheless, teaching students to code paves the path for increased inquiry on their behalf and greater development of critical thinking skills.

One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “In addition, coding encourages children to be creative. ” I think this quote is great because there is often a censoring of student creativity within the classroom because of the importance that accuracy and adhering to rigid expectations has. Coding provides students with the space to makes choices driven by their autonomy and creative decision making. 

Another sentence that I loved was: “Children learn a lot through play and, with a program such as Scratch, they would have fun and learn .” This stood out for me because I am a very big believer that learning can and should be fun. When students are more focused on the fun that they are having while learning, the learning does not feel as difficult nor tedious. Students should want to learn and be motivated to engage in activity.

Have you seen this article called “3 Reasons to Use Scratch Across the Curriculum”? ( https://www.iste.org/explore/Computer-Science/3-reasons-to-use-Scratch-across-the-curriculum ) I thought you might be interested in this because of the reasons that they share about the benefits of using Scratch across the curriculum, similar to the point you made regarding the effectiveness of the program in different subject areas. 

Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because your writing is very insightful.

Nile
August 19, 2021 8:44 pm

Hi Laura:

You proposed such a great question on whether coding should be implemented into the children’s curriculum. I think it depends on a variety of things that must be taken into consideration. The grade level and the type of students that are enrolled at a particular school could determine how successful the outcome will be. In a school where students are gifted, highly intelligent and take advanced courses for example might do extraordinary well. In a school where students might not perform as well, coding could create severe challenges for some students. Students with behavior issues might not be able to focus using coding. Students on the other hand who are gifted might be bored and aren’t being challenged because they might find the program too easy for them. In either side, implementing coding brings its set of challenges.

Marina
August 17, 2021 3:52 pm

Dear Laura: 

I am grateful for your post, “Coding for Children,” because you advocate for the implementation and integration of computational thinking and coding for our youngest learners. This is exciting to think about since coding and computational thinking are often introduced to learners much later in the educational setting. Your post honors the role that coding plays in a whole child approach that celebrates inquiry.  

One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “But when young children are exposed to coding in the classrooms, this promotes and supports children’s inquiry development.” I think this is insightful because inquiry and discovery approaches are how many people make sense of their world. If young children are given experiences to tinker and experiment with coding, the possibilities are endless. Coding can be a playground that leads to questions, investigation, more questions, sharing findings with others, prototyping, and reflection. I think it is exciting that you mentioned the connection to inquiry. 

Another sentence that I agree with was: “Teaching children to code is an important skill that children should learn because it provides opportunities for young learners to grow and expand their knowledge in different academic subjects such as math, writing, of, and other skills, which are valuable in life.” This stood out for me because you are describing coding as a portable and transferrable skill. This is fascinating to think about. Coding may be a support to unlock other areas for learners. 

Have you seen this NPR article, Coding Class, The Naptime: Computer Science for the Kindergarten Set?   I thought you might be interested in this because the author reinforces some of the points that you are making about the necessity for coding in early childhood. She describes the benefits that exist and shares several examples and vignettes from the classroom. Additionally, she addresses some counterpoints – conflicting opinions of screen time was an issue that she identified. She shares how off-screen activities for coding and computational thinking are also valuable experiences and that including computer science does not mean one hundred percent on devices. 

Thanks for your writing and sharing your ideas.

Marina

Maritza
August 16, 2021 4:15 am

Dear Laura:

I am thrilled by your post, “Coding for Children” because you speak about the importance of teaching children how to code at a young age. Coding is a skill that children need to learn in order to understand technology and the world we live in.

One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Teaching children to code is an important skill that children should learn because it provides opportunities for young learners to grow and expand their knowledge in different academic subjects such as math, writing, reading, and other skills, which are valuable in life”. I think this is a great point because not many people are aware that coding can be associated with many other disciplines. Programs like Scratch make it possible for students to explore coding while linking it to other subject areas. For example, they can create their own story (ELA), build their own community with sprites (Social Studies), learn math concepts by using blocks such as “set x to” or “set y to”, and so on.

Another sentence that amused me was: “I believe programs such as Scratch should be incorporated into the curriculum because this program will help students to have a better understanding of different academic areas, and also reach a maximum learning potential”. This stood out for me because like me, many educators are not familiar with Scratch. I believe that once teachers know more about this program they will also think that implementing in the classrooms will benefit students because they will be able to develop and support their computational thinking skills by creating projects using the Scratch program.

Have you seen this article, “8 reasons why every child should learn to code” by Chontelle Bonfiglio? (https://teachyourkidscode.com/why-coding-is-important-to-learn/)I thought you might be interested in this because the author provides the audience with 8 important reasons of why children should learn how to code. It’s a great resource to share with other educators and parents.

Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because I will be working this year in a pre-k setting and it will be very useful to find out more information about how I can introduce coding to children in that grade level. 

Youth Voices is an open publishing and social networking platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.  See more About Youth Voices. Terms of Service. Privacy Policy.All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

CONTACT US

We welcome new members. You can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending
Help on Youth Voices
4
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
or

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

or

Create Account