brown brain

The idea of lucid dreaming seems impossible to some due to the complexity of the dreams and how simple it would be to just open your eyes. Though it may be difficult to stay asleep once one realizes they are dreaming, it is always possible to.

The areas of your brain that are most active are the prefrontal cortex and the temporoparietal junction. These two areas of the brain are responsible for coming together to form our body schema and self-image (Blackmore). This causes one to feel like they are in a state of consciousness and acting like they normally would, while in a dream.

The prefrontal cortex of the brain is located at the very front of one’s brain and this section of the brain is mostly focused on controlling short-sighted behaviors. These can include, decision-making, problem-solving, self-control, and acting with long-term goals in mind.

The Temporoparietal junction is mostly responsible for numerous aspects of social cognition (Neurosci). This region of the brain is most active during tasks of cognitive empathy and when taking others perspectives into consideration.

When these two areas of the brain are awake and functioning during periods of Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, this leads to lucid dreaming. The explanation behind lucid dreaming is related to the complex composition of our thoughts and emotions in our brain.

There have been many studies collecting data about brain activity during lucid dreaming and the emotions that are conveyed throughout the dream vary drastically (Turner).

Depending on what parts of the brain are active during the dream, the content of the dream and the response of the person will differ. The concept of lucid dreaming is highly complex and the science behind brain activity while sleeping is only one of the traits that make each person’s dreams, and dream experiences, different.

Sources

Blackmore, Susan. “How Is Lucid Dreaming Possible?” BBC Science Focus Magazine, www.sciencefocus.com/the-human-body/how-is-lucid-dreaming-possible/.

Neurosci. “Know Your Brain: Prefrontal Cortex.” Neuroscientifically Challenged, Neuroscientifically Challenged, 18 May 2014, www.neuroscientificallychallenged.com/blog/2014/5/16/know-your-brain-prefrontal-cortex.

Turner, Rebecca. “What Is Lucid Dreaming?” World of Lucid Dreaming, www.world-of-lucid-dreaming.com/what-is-lucid-dreaming.html.

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6 Comments
  1. Wendy 4 weeks ago

    Julia, I was really fascinated by your post “An Explanation to Lucid Dreaming”. This is a topic that I have been drawn to before as I’m aware of the complexity behind the science of lucid dreaming, which is why I’ve always wanted to obtain a better understanding of it. A sentence that stood out to me was, “The explanation behind lucid dreaming is related to the complex composition of our thoughts and emotions in our brain.” We don’t realize how powerful our minds really are, to the fascinating capabilities that affect our dreams. I really enjoyed reading your piece and look forward to reading more of your work.

  2. Heidi 4 weeks ago

    Dear Julia, I really enjoyed reading your post, “An Explanation To Lucid Dreaming” because it’s an interesting topic. Also, I have tried to control my dreams but I couldn’t. One sentence that you wrote that stood out to me was “Though it may be difficult to stay asleep once one realizes they are dreaming, it is always possible to.” This is interesting to me because whenever I realize when I dream I tend to wake up because it gets hard to stay asleep. Also when I go to sleep I never realize that I am sleeping, I just feel my body relaxing. Thanks for your writing. I look forward to what you write next.

  3. Evelyn 4 weeks ago

    Julia,
    I found your article very informational and intriguing. It was really interesting to read and understand how the brain allows one to lucid dream and the different areas of the brain that are needed to do this specific kind of dreaming. I think if you explained how to lucid dream or what it allows someone to dream about as well as how the brain is able to do it, that would really pull the article together. Great job!

  4. Matthew 1 month ago

    Julia, I found your post about Lucid dreaming very interesting, especially the science behind it. I have always been interested in the concept of lucid dreaming, as I used to make attempts of having some sort of chance with them. Unfortunately, I have yet to experience one, so it’s still something very foreign to me. Something that caught my eye was: “This causes one to feel like they are in a state of consciousness and acting like they normally would, while in a dream…The explanation behind lucid dreaming is related to the complex composition of our thoughts and emotions in our brain.” The fact that you could be aware and conscious that you’re in a dream is fascinating to me because you’re able to make actions out of your own free will. I think there could also be a possibility in the future of artificially making dreams through technology and creating an array of opportunities that it could be used for. Thanks for writing. I enjoyed the topic you wrote about, so I hope to see what you have next.

  5. Dominique 1 month ago

    I’m really fascinated by this information! I have experienced lucid dreaming before but never understood what it truly was. I always thought that emotions and thoughts impacted dreams but didn’t know it’s what creates them!

  6. Ellie 1 month ago

    Julia, I really enjoyed this piece and I definitely learned a lot about lucid dreaming and the brain. Lucid dreaming has always been one of those things that I knew happened, but I never really understood how. That’s why I especially enjoyed your descriptions of parts of the brain involved in lucid dreaming and your clear explanations of how they work (especially the temporoparietal junction, it never gets the recognition it deserves). Good job! I look forward to more from you!

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