Protesters run from percussion grenades and teargas Photograph: Carlos Gonzalez/AP

Characters:

Stephanie, an 18-year-old, is a student who supports the protest “Black Lives Matter.” She believes it is finally time to stand up and fight for justice. 

Amber, a 20-year-old, is a student who supports the protest “Black Lives Matter.” She joins to fight for justice with her friends. She believes that the more people unite, the louder our voices will be.

Martin Luther King, Jr., a 37- year-old, is an activist who was the leader of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. King believed in non-violence.

Kimberly Jones, a 34-year-old, is an author and activist who supports “Black Lives Matter.” She believes that looting is okay to a point because of the history of violence against Blacks.

Setting:

In Minneapolis, late May 2020 while the “Black Lives Matter” protest was going on. Stephanie was standing up with the rest of the crowd, angry, asking for justice. Kimberly Jones is standing across from Stephanie supporting the march but with different reasons. Kimberly thinks that looting is what it takes for the world to see the need for justice but Stephanie doesn’t agree.

KIMBERLY

(Kimberly approached Stephanie from across the street. Stephanie is standing with a cardboard sign that says “No justice no peace.”)

STEPHANIE

(Stephanie is scared because the police are using all types of methods to get people out.)

“Do you think they are actually going to hurt us?”

KIMBERLY

“Yes! If we stay here they might do. So let’s run!”

(Kimberly holds Stephanie’s hand as they run!)

KIMBERLY

I know it’s not nice or pretty, but some people feel this is the only way Black people can get what we’ve never been able to get. We have to protest, riot, loot, anything that will make people listen!

STEPHANIE

(Stephanie doesn’t feel right about what Kimberly is saying.)

I don’t think so! That’s burning down our own community and promoting violence.

AMBER

(Amber is shocked by listening to Stephanie and Kimberly when they stopped from running.)

STEPHANIE

What do you think, Amber? After all you have said in the past that we should only do positive actions to build up our community. Do you agree with me or Kimberly?   

(Amber slowly moves next to Stephanie making it obvious she’s on Stephanie’s side.)

AMBER

(Amber shows a sad face towards Kimber notting her face side to side. )

I believe the more people unite together, we will have a stronger voice and would make everyone listen to us!

KIMBERLY

I disagree with you, Amber! Do you know we make these owners from our daily stores rich? And us? We stay in the same business, dealing with these types of injustice!

STEPHANIE 

But is doing those types of things going to get you rich?

AMBER

You can go your way looting but I guarantee you, it would get you in trouble.

STEPHANIE 

You are totally right!

AMBER

So come on! Change your mind, think about it!

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

(Martin approaches while still listening to Stephanie, Amber & Kimberly)

I’ve been listening for some time now, and I think what these girls are telling you is right, look let me tell you something.

I’m still convinced that nonviolence is the most potent weapon available to oppressed people in their struggle for freedom and justice. I feel that violence will only create more social problems than they will solve. That in a real sense it is impracticable for the Negro to even think of mounting a violent revolution in the United States.”

The Other America, Martin Luther King, jr. (1967)

Authors

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12 Comments
  1. Gabi 1 week ago

    I really enjoyed this article and loved how it is very appropriate to the time period and realistic especially towards today. The different point of veiws and opinions is really cool. You say “ Martin approaches while still listening to Stephanie, Amber & Kimberly) I’ve been listening for some time now, and I think what these girls are telling you is right, look let me tell you something.” And I wanna know if he was actually supposed to be there or if he was just supposed to be in their head. I can connect this to me because when I watch the news or videos about the riots and looting I feel so bad for the store owners who get looted and when I watch the protests I feel so bad for the protesters. No one deserves this and the way you made this article really shows what’s going on behind the scenes. If I was in Ambers shoes I would just leave because being peer pressured into doing something like that is crazy.

  2. Jacob Coffman 1 week ago

    I really appreciate the fact that this article really does relate to the world nowadays. I like how there are two different sides with two different opinions. There many instances in this article that I’m sure have happened over the past few months. For example, “I believe the more people unite together, we will have a stronger voice and would make everyone listen to us!” This is something that many people who have been protesting can relate to. I can connect that quote to the NBA. The NBA has been peacefully protesting as group; united as one, so they can have their voices heard. Kimberly, I hear your point that looting should be okay, but in reality, if you want to prove a point and inspire others, peacefully protesting would be more reasonable. I find it very interesting how the writer brings in MLK at the end to show that what is happening now with the protesting and the Civil Rights Movement, is extremely similar to what happened in the 1960’s.

  3. Ella C 1 week ago

    I enjoyed the article and appreciated how it is very relevant and realistic, especially towards nowdays. The different point of veiws and opinions is a internal struggle that I think many BLM supporters have and still face. Everyone has different opinions on how to make a point and get their voices heard, and its hard for people to listen to othersand let go of their own opinion. “I disagree with you, Amber! Do you know we make these owners from our daily stores rich? And us? We stay in the same business, dealing with these types of injustice!….So come on! Change your mind, think about it!” this part of the qoute makes me wonder if sometimes people loot or do things because of peer pressure, instead of the reason being their own opinions and POV. If possible, I would like to ask; is Martin Luther King actually present or is he more like a reminder or flashback in their mind?

  4. Trey Vestal 1 week ago

    I appreciate how this article relates to what is going on in the world today. Some of the parts in the article, such as “ We have to protest, riot, loot, anything that will make people listen!” are similar to conversations that I’m sure protesters are having right now. I understand that you want your voices to be heard, but I feel that peaceful protests are most effective because the police will not have to get involved. Kimberly, if I were in your shoes, I would consider what would be best for the protest as a whole, and committing a crime would have an influence on others, which In my opinion, would make it unsuccessful protest.

  5. Jack Keyes 1 week ago

    I really liked this article because the little dialogs and the emotions these people were experiencing at the time. It really explains more on what the highlighted people were feeling and saying. This article also gives readers a greater perspective on the peoples perspectives specifically because its explains specifically how they were feeling to themselves and what they were saying out loud. I do have one question,

    “(Martin approaches while still listening to Stephanie, Amber & Kimberly)

    I’ve been listening for some time now, and I think what these girls are telling you is right, look let me tell you something. ”
    Is this story real and based on real stories or is this a made up story to help explain the times we are experiencing?

  6. Jake 1 week ago

    This story is very inspiring Kelly, a great job. “I’ve been listening for some time now, and I think what these girls are telling you is right, look let me tell you something.” That’s huge and to be able to produce someone powerful words like that is very strong and coming from your side of the story makes it a talent of bravery that lead to success. I hear you on all the differences in BLM and how people use it. Overall great job!

  7. Emily F 1 week ago

    I really enjoyed reading this article, as it is very relevant and a really realistic situation in these times. This internal struggle is something I’m sure many BLM supporters have experienced. If I could, I’d just like to probe a bit and ask for clarification of one thing; in this narrative, is Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. a real person in the present, or more of a symbolic character? I think both would be very interesting perspectives. As for the actual conflict in this story, I do want to acknowledge that both sides of the argument are valid, and while can’t speak to the experience of being a black person during this movement (or ever), as an ally I can understand how one would want to advance the movement by staying peaceful and choosing love over hate. At the same time, with peaceful protests being turned violent by undercover police and white supremacists and the fact that there’s still no justice for so many, I can empathize with the experience of feeling unheard and ignored. Even MLK himself has said that, “Riots are the language of the unheard,” which is interesting considering his peaceful legacy. Overall loved this article. It was very thought provoking. 🙂

  8. Natalie 1 week ago

    I enjoyed reading this post as it relates to many during the protest. Many are conflicted by silent protest and violent protest in order for their voices to be heard. I get the built of anger for several years due to the circumstances many had to endure more personally than other. However, I believe the quote by MLK is powerful enough to express the importance and relevance of a peaceful protest. He expresses that two wrongs don’t make a right. He understands that many of those in power still walk around with their heads held high and unbothered that people are protesting, but their issues are being heard as its unavoidable.

  9. Mauricio 2 weeks ago

    I liked your article cuz it talks about the violence and the nonviolent protest that has been going on these past days.l believe and agree whit your protesters only act violent when theres violence coming towards you .Violence only creates more violence .

  10. Selena 3 weeks ago

    Protesting and looting to some people is a way of voice. Some in the black community have a reason to believe in non-violence or violence when it comes to unjustice is made in that community get upset. Violence starts more violence during these times. In your article, Stephanie has a point, “I don’t think so! That’s burning down our own community and promoting.” Seeing the causes and effects of protesting and looting and the situation may be big but non-violence is and can be a voice. Ultimately it is your decision but make sure its the best one because you do not want to get hurting during these times of looting. Over all it was a great article, and really opens up your eyes and seeing the problems that society has today.

  11. Tadeo 4 weeks ago

    I guess MLK’s Zombie is just casually roaming around for no reason. I don’t get it, the poor man’s been dead for a long time. Is this part of a play or what? I am confused.

  12. Fatima Esparza 4 weeks ago

    Dear Kelly
    I am amazed by your post “Why do people protest with looting & violence?” because throughout your post I thought to myself why are people acting with violence when protesting? and your post gives an example of those. People now days think that acting with violence will get them what they need or what they are looking for. There is no dought that violence might be needed sometimes and might have to be useful but if there is no need for this then why do it. One sentence you wrote that stands out to me is ” Do you think they are actually going to hurt us?” “Yes! If we stay here they might do. So let’s run!” I think this is amazing the clarification that you give about the way sometimes protestors are treated but also how they react instead of just acting how they treat them. Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because it was really interesting to see that a lot of people are concerned about the protestors when they go out to get justice. Also, realizing that sometimes acting with violence towards someone could bring a lot of trouble.
    Fatima Esparza

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