As more and more people learn how important it is to teach people at young ages about nutrition and what really matters when it comes to being healthy, it is becoming more apparent the different ways in which this can happen.

An example of this is the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH). Due to the rise of childhood obesity, CATCH was created and organized. In order to decrease childhood obesity rates, CATCH targets elementary school, middle school, and an after-school and pre-school. In their approach, they use strategies in order to enhance physical activity and healthy eating with classroom curriculums, physical education, school nutrition services, and finally, family involvement. CATCH has been described as being “the most cost-effective school-based program for teaching school kids how to eat and exercise regularly.” And finally, CATCH is organized to work with kits in physical education classes for grades K-2, 3-5, and 6-8 and with EAT SMART (a guide to plan, purchase, and promote healthy food) in cafeterias.I also created a survey that was released to people at my school. In the survey I asked questions that connected to my topic of the lack of nutrition education in schools. For example, I asked things like “Do you think you’ve had enough education on proper nutrition?”, “Do you think nutrition education in schools is necessary? Why?” and to gain insight on whether or not they have background knowledge of nutrition in general, I asked “Do you eat three meals a day? More? Less? Why?” The results to all the questions I asked were very interesting. However, the most important answer I looked at was if people think education on nutrition is necessary. Fortunately, lots of people believe that nutrition education in schools is necessary because learning more about healthy eating and what really matters can help positively impact the future of generations. As long as more people learn the importance of nutrition education, the more likely it is that a change can happen.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Lack of Education on Nutrition to Younger Generations Part 3 by Kaitlyn is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

1 Comment
  1. Abraham 1 month ago

    I thought your topic was captivating because nutrition is often neglected in schools, though it should always be taught to create a healthy population. From my experiences, I noticed that we learn more about nutrition at a young age, but as we grow older education about nutrition slowly fades away. It’s extremely important to educate people about nutrition because it is the foundation of being healthy and creating wellbeing. Promoting good health leads to many benefits such as lowering the cost of health care because fewer people are getting sick.

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Youth Voices is an open publishing platform for youth. The site is organized by teachers with support from the National Writing Project. Opinions expressed by writers are their own.

CC BY-SA 4.0All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License

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