The Last Chapter of Saints (like a sequel to Boxers) reveal both Bao and Vibiana’s fate as in Boxer’s you only see how Bao ends up dying, as the Boxer’s portion of these books is told from his perspective. It honestly leaves the reader in a state of emptiness. Bao dies at the end of Boxers so it would seem that Vibiana would be the one to prevail, but actually she dies in the most surprising yet blunt way there is. It is surprising that she would die to the hands of Bao, but also it leaves the reader asking themselves “that’s it? That’s how she dies”(Saints,Pg 162) On the page which she dies it reads “And that’s it. That’s how I died. unable to protect anyone” and the reason why this line is important is because there was all this build up with her and Kong and training to fight the Boxers, that you expect her to go through a battle with the boxers. But she doesn’t. She just dies, pretty much immediately. All that readers excitement and expectations are crushed the moment they form.

The point of view switches from the book Boxers to the Book Saints. It being from Bao’s point of view in the first book and Vibiana’s point of view in the second. What is interesting about this POV switch, is you don’t really see what each character thinks of one another because they don’t exactly interact until the end of the book. But you do see what the opposing sides (the Boxers VS the Saints) think of each other through Bao and Vibiana. It is interesting how Gene Luen Yang is able to use Bao and Vibiana to represent their opposing sides while still being able to give them their own storylines. Both sides obviously think poorly of another, they are at war. “Hey let me teach you a prayer. Why should I learn a prayer of the foreign devils” (Saints, 159) While Vibiana is trying to convert Bao to her religion, which means she has to oppose his. Bao is brushing her off. This also ties into Bao and Vibiana supposedly representing their opposing sides in the book because the Christians(saints) were trying to convert the Chinese(boxers) to Christianity. The Chinese who weren’t going to be converted retaliated as does Bao on this page.There isn’t really taking sides in this book because it was the Chinese people who converted to Christianity’s choice to convert I suppose. And it is expected for the Chinese to retaliate against people who are trying to take their culture away from them. The point of view change also reveals that Bao sees himself and the boxers as god’s. This is more visually revealed when in Boxer’s, an army of gods form at the Saints headquarters, while in Saints they are human. Their constant wins against the Saints in the past seemed to have given him a big head. Which ultimately leads to the Boxers downfall during the Boxers VS Saints battle because he thinks he is invincible.

After Bao realizes he and his army can actually die and get hurt the reader also realizes that the Boxers aren’t actually gods among the Saints and will end up being overthrown by the Saints due to their lack of advanced weaponry.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Representing Opposing Sides in “Boxers & Saints” by Gene Luen Yang by Ruth is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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