Part Five

Hateful speech should not be encouraged but it is a freedom that is protected and hate speech is different than a call to action. Term ‘hate speech’ does have a definition but not a legal one. That means that having hateful speech and ‘rude’ language isn’t against the law in the United States. Recorded in the American Library Association in an article titled “Hate Speech and Hate Crimes,” Kpekoll states that “Under current First Amendment jurisprudence, hate speech can only be criminalized when it directly incites imminent criminal activity or consists of specific threats of violence targeted against a person or group” (Kpekoll, 2018). This source was on the opposing side but it does have the same thing stated in Steven Crowder’s Change My Mind, on the aligning side. There is a difference between a call to action and hate speech, if looking at the definiton. Calls to action are against the law, for example, you can’t yell “fire” in a movie theater or say “go kill Bob.” Hate speech is more similar with rudeness, unpatriotic speech, and evil ideas. Despite how our moral lines fall, as much as we don’t like rudeness, it is protected under the First Amendment.

Zuckerberg spoke with congress in the article “Mark Zuckerberg Tells Congress His Plans to Stop ‘Hate Speech.’ It’s Disturbing” where he talked about “monitoring hate speech” (Burnett, 2018). As a private business that is allowed even though it may seem that it violates the First Amendment, it does not legally because it is a private business. However, if this is then applied to law it will be chaotic. Reason for that is because then speech would no longer be free and then speech will be debated. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion therefore it should not be put into a legal definition. Pushing the idea of political correctness and hate speech does, stated by Burkeman, “mean(s) something to people and helps them follow the social norm,”  but in the article “S.J. Harris, Stunt Driver in ‘Deadpool 2’ Died Over Political Correctness?” Brodigan claimed that, “the UCLA blamed the lack of diversity for stunt drivers” (Burkeman, 2014; Brodigan, 2017). Overall meaning if political correctness does mean something to people it is pushing them in the wrong direction if examining the Deadpool 2 stunt driver.

Hateful speech is bad as much as everyone can basically agree, but hate speech can’t be monitored. Not only would it be hard to determine what falls under the term and what doesn’t, but the First Amendment protects the right to say whatever we the people want to, even if it is something that is rude or hateful. Keep in mind that hateful words aren’t popularly tolerated like rudeness, but it shouldn’t have a legal definition because it is basically impossible to monitor it but also it can eventually be manipulated into slander or libel.  Like the Supreme Court stated, we must “Protect the thought that we hate” (2015). Because in the end, if you silence one, you silence all, and it silences you.

Part 5 sources

References

Brodigan. (2017, August 24). Political Correctness Kills: Deceased ‘Deadpool 2’ Stunt Driver Lacked Experience. But was ‘Female and Black’… Retrieved from https://www.louderwithcrowder.com/diveristy-qualifications-deadpool-2-death-prevented/

Burnett, K. (2018, April 10). Mark Zuckerberg Just Told Congress His Plan to Stop “Hate Speech.” It’s Flat Out Disturbing… Retrieved from https://www.louderwithcrowder.com/mark-zuckerberg-congress-hate-speech/

Kpekoll. (2018, July 11). Hate Speech and Hate Crime. Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/hate

When Free Speech Disappears From Campus. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2015/11/02/when-a-generation-becomes-less-tolerant-of-free-speech/the-importance-of-protecting-even-the-thoughts-we-hate

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Political Correctness and Hate Speech by Kaleigh is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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