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4/22/19

Daniel Rodriguez, Diego Casillas, Joseph Thornton

Dearest Nestle brand:

We are writing to you today because you have been throwing an absurd amount of plastic packaging into our oceans which is really damaging our oceanic ecosystems. The companies that produce plastic for your products keep making more and more and even if you know that all that plastic would be going in the ocean, you don’t do anything about it.  

Our issue with your business model is that your products use one-time use plastics for their packaging which get thrown away by the general public which can lead to the ocean getting massive amounts plastic in it since so many people use your products. Because of all the plastic packaging being in an ecosystem, every animal in the ocean can be affected because of how the ocean’s currents move the trash all around the globe. With all the trash in the water, the animals there can be affected negatively which not only affects the predators there, but also people because we eat the animals in ocean. Dr Abigail Entwistle from Fauna & Flora International has seen how the trash we throw out into the ocean affects the organisms. Dr Entwistle stated, “Seabirds, marine mammals and sea turtles can accidently eat or become entangled in plastic debris, with devastating consequences” (Entwistle). Communities that have aquatic animals in their day to day lives will have a harder time because of how plastic can affect the organism or kill it entirely like choking to death. If the producers or herbivores died, the carnivores would starve and if the carnovoirs died, there would be a surplus of herbivores that would shorten the amount of producers and all because of your plastic Nestle. You may not know it Nestle, but you benefit from all this because you don’t have to take the time to use reusable plastic or biodegradable plastic. Your acts are all institutional oppression to the fish-based communities because they can have less food to consume or mess with the market for aquatic life. Moreover, shell based organisms like coral and mollusks get hurt immensely from acidity. Melissa Denchak says how burning fossil fuels makes oceans more acidic. Denchak  While our allies can include communities of people wanting cleaner oceans, your allies are little to none.

In order to make a change and clean our oceans, it would be beneficial to observe other past actions done to complete our same goal. By doing this we can get a better idea of what we can do to make the Ocean clean of  plastic and other single use material.

To start, Peru is making changes that go against the production of single use materials such as plastic. This plan is written in the article “A Running List of Action on Plastic Pollution” by  Brian Clark Howard, Sarah Gibbens, Elaina Zachos, and Laura Parker. The article reads, “Visitors will no longer be allowed to carry in single-use plastics into Peru’s 76 natural and cultural protected areas, from Machu Picchu to Manu to Huascarán, or national museums” This action in itself shows that ocean pollution caused by single use plastics is a hugely serious issue seeing as how leaders of countries are making political changes to better the situation of the pollution. And to counter any claim that the reason of this change being due to the goal of spending less money or anything selfish like that, later in the article the actual goal of this change is stated. The article states, “The decree says the goal is replacing single-use plastics with ‘reusable, biodegradable plastic or others whose degradation does not generate contamination by micro-plastics or dangerous substances’” (Howard, Gibbens, Zachos, and Parker). As you can see Nestle, the main focus of this change is to switch to more widely using “reusable biodegradable plastic”, in order to create less pollution made by microplastics from single use plastics. These leaders used political organizing to come together and realised what would be best in the law to better the environment. The fact that this positive change was made into a law is important to observe because it shows that there are ways to encourage and enforce the stop of using single use plastic and that making this change isn’t far fetched. Hopefully this action can inspire you to make company changes that improve our Oceans health. Furthermore, another example to look at for the bettering of Ocean pollution is a petition that is made to get support from those who wish to see the end of Ocean pollution. It’s called the “End Plastic Pollution Petition” from the Earth Day Network. An excerpt from the petition reads, “Tell our global leaders that the world can’t take much more plastic. If enough of us get behind a global ban on single use plastics, we can begin to heal our oceans, our wildlife, and our children” (Earth Day Network). This petition takes advantage of the tactic of social change, political organizing. This tactic is done by the network organizing the thoughts and support of the community and making a big change as a result of the organization. The reason this petition for change is important to observe is because the fact that there are people that are supporting the end of plastic pollution shows that if you were to make a change to your use of single use plastic, there would be plenty of support for the change and it will put a positive mark on your reputation.  It would be nice to know that a big company actually wants to make a positive change instead of just being focussed on popularity and money. Try to take these action into consideration and use them to make some changes of your own.

Looking at these examples of social change, we’d like to focus on cutting down on single use plastics. We’ve chosen to commit this change within our community. Our plan is to Make a petition to have our school design and give out reusable water bottles to students during registration for school. This will help students have a way to refill their bottle to hydrate themselves each day without using single use plastic and throwing it away each day for school. We’ll put this into motion by sending an email to our principal and vice principal explaining the students want for these reusable water bottles. This is a good plan because we’re using community organizing, political organizing, and direct service to prevent pollution. These bottles will also be perfect includement to our school since students can refill their bottle with the new filtered water dispenser our school has had installed. With that, we can make a positive change to our Ocean along with making a more convenient alternative for the students in our community.

This is a picture of  possible designs for the reusable water bottles:

Thank you so much for listening to me Daniel Rodriguez, Joseph Thornton, and Diego Casillas.

Annotated Bibliography

Denchak, Melissa. “Ocean Pollution: The Dirty Facts.” NRDC, NRDC, 17 Jan. 2019, www.nrdc.org/stories/ocean-pollution-dirty-facts.

This article explains how our oceans are becoming more and more acidic because of air pollution and polluting the ocean itself. This is a credible source because Melissa Denchark is a freelance writer and editor who has written many stories on Climate change and environmental science.


“End Plastic Pollution Petition.” Earth Day Network, Earth Day Network, www.earthday.org/end-plastic-pollution-petition/.

This petition to prevent Ocean Pollution that explains why the change needs to happen. The petition explains the enormous amount of plastic that is dumped into the Ocean each year, informing the reader about the intensity of plastic pollution so they can support the petition. This is credible because Earth Day Network’s mission is to diversify, educate and activate the environmental movement worldwide. This shows they are truly working toward a beneficial and non selfish goal for the Earth.

Entwistle, Abigail. “Plastic Pollution: Our Disposable Life.” Fauna & Flora International, 9 Nov. 2017, www.fauna-flora.org/news/plastic-pollution-disposable-life.

“Fauna & Flora International’s Director of Science, Dr Abigail Entwistle, discusses the consequences of our global addiction to throwaway plastic.” The article describes how plastic in the Ocean can mess up the natural cycle and system of Ocean life. This source is credible because Dr Abigail Entwistle is a Director of Conservation Science, showing she’s a professional in this field of science.

Greenpeace International. “Greenpeace Activists Ship ‘Plastic Monster’ Back to Nestlé’s Headquarters.” Greenpeace International, Greenpeace , 16 Apr. 2019, www.greenpeace.org/international/press-release/21780/greenpeace-ship-plastic-waste-nestle-headquarters/.

This article is about how Nestle has so much of their plastic packaging in our oceans and how people are getting angry at them since their trash is increasingly going into the ocean per year. This is a credible source because Greenpeace have been doing actions against Nestle like sending a plastic monster to their headquarters. Also the domain of their website is a .org.  

Howard, Brian Clark. “A Running List of Action on Plastic Pollution.” A Running List of Action on Plastic Pollution, 11 Jan. 2019, www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/07/ocean-plastic-pollution-solutions/.

This article is about list of actions that are being made around the world to stop ocean pollution. This article helped me show the efforts being made for the sake of a cleaner Ocean. This is credible because Brian Clark Howard covers environment, science, tech, and other topics, and is active in social media.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Ocean Conservation: #1 Priority by Joseph is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

6 Comments
  1. Trinity 1 month ago

    Dear Daniel, Joseph, and Diego:

    I am in agreement with your article, “Ocean Conservation: #1 Priority,” because I understand that animals and people are negatively affected by plastic pollution. I understand that plastic can break down into tiny pieces and consumed by creatures who then suffer as a result. I love how your article brings out the issue and encourages people and companies to take steps to fix the issue.

    One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Because of all the plastic packaging being in an ecosystem, every animal in the ocean can be affected because of how the ocean’s currents move the trash all around the globe. With all the trash in the water, the animals there can be affected negatively which not only affects the predators there, but also people because we eat the animals in ocean. ” I think this is interesting because it shows how plastic waste travels and affects all animals. A small plastic wrapper could end up harming an animal miles away. There is no way for animals to escape plastic pollution’s harmful affects except to stop polluting. Bringing this issue to light is admirable. I enjoyed how you showed how this truly affects every animal.

    Another sentence that I thought was intriguing was: “The article reads, “Visitors will no longer be allowed to carry in single-use plastics into Peru’s 76 natural and cultural protected areas, from Machu Picchu to Manu to Huascarán, or national museums”” This stood out for me because it was a good example of how leaders of other countries are making changes to improve the situation of plastic pollution. I think it’s important to recognize the actions people take to create less pollution and show how encouraging and enforcing the stop of using single use plastic is possible.

    I definitely agree with you that Nestle should change their packaging. One reason I say this is that their packaging is a one-time use plastic and when it gets thrown away, the improper disposable can lead to the ocean getting massive amounts of plastic. Nestle is a big company, and encouraging them to change their packaging and significantly reduce the amount of plastic used. Another reason I agree with you is because plastic packaging in the ecosystem harms all animals. It affects not only the animals, but also humans because we eventually catch and eat the animals that die as a result of our plastic pollution.

    Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next, because this article was very detailed and I can see that you guys put a lot of detail and effort into it. I’m glad you’re raising awareness of this issue and encouraging large companies to change their products. I’m excited to see what else you guys will put out.

    Sincerely,
    Trinity Z.

  2. Mansha 1 month ago

    Dear Joseph, Daniel, and Diego,

    I am intrigued by your post because it is very well researched and even taught me about Peru’s protest against single use plastic. I also liked how you talked about ways people can reduce their plastic pollution intake.
    One thing you said that stands out for me is: “Dearest Nestle brand: We are writing to you today because you have been throwing an absurd amount of plastic packaging into our oceans which is really damaging our oceanic ecosystems” because it is interesting how you wrote your post like a letter and directly talked to Nestle instead of talking about it to your audience. Your animations and images are also really good as they are good at conveying your message to the audience. Thanks for your effort in informing people about the issue that is plastic pollution. I look forward to seeing what you write next. Best of luck! Check out our blog right here!: http://plasticearth.home.blog

  3. Andrew 1 month ago

    Hello, Diego, Joesph, and Daniel,
    I am impressed this your blog post because of how well researched it was and how good your arguments were. There were good points made in this blog post. One quote that stands out to me is “Our issue with your business model is that your products use one-time use plastics for their packaging which get thrown away by the general public which can lead to the ocean getting massive amounts plastic in it since so many people use your products. Because of all the plastic packaging being in an ecosystem, every animal in the ocean can be affected because of how the ocean’s currents move the trash all around the globe. With all the trash in the water, the animals there can be affected negatively which not only affects the predators there, but also people because we eat the animals in ocean. ” is good because you connect how animals being harmed by plastic hurts us humans as well. This would get people to be less careless with how they dispose of plastic waste. I am also making a blog post on WordPress that is also about plastic in the ocean.
    Here is the link to it: https://plasticintheocean.video.blog/

    I agree with your arguments and I look forward to seeing more from you.

    Sincerely,

    Andrew

  4. Audrey 2 months ago

    Joseph, Daniel, and Diego,

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this article. Ocean conservation is something that is important to me too. I think you guys supported your argument well and I like how you even used worldwide examples. One suggestion is it would be beneficial if you guys included information about alternatives or solutions for the single use plastic issue that Nestle has. I think it would make your argument stronger and it would also be an interesting topic to research. Here is an article about alternatives to single use plastic to get you started (https://packagingeurope.com/are-alternatives-to-single-use-plastics-the-answer/).
    Thank you for sharing this article, I look forward to reading more of your work in the future.

    Sincerely,
    Audrey

  5. Cristina 2 months ago

    Hello Joseph, Diego, and Daniel,
    I am very impressed by all the work you guys did into completing this post, “Ocean Conservation” because it shows that you guys care about nature and the importance of clean oceans. The visual of the glove made it easy to understand how exactly the ocean currents move. It is really sad to see how our oceans are turning into garbage dumpsters, leading to harmful unbalanced levels of ocean acidity as well affecting the life of many species that live and interact and feed from the oceans. Nestle and many other food companies as you guys point out need to move away from those single use plastic packaging that in the long run not only affects the animals, but also us the humans. I can say that your post made me be more aware and concern of the use of single use plastic specially since I live in Santa Cruz which is town that has access to the ocean. Walking along the beach I can see the problem of plastic and I totally want to see garbage free beaches and oceans. You guys made me think that next time I go for a walk in the beach I can do some beach garbage pick up, and the other thing I want to do is to cut us much on the use of single use plastic. I love the idea you guys came up with, which is to provide students on their first day of classes with a reusable water bottle. Ideas like this need to be supported and implemented to move forward into a more friendly environment for all.

  6. Erica Hodgin 2 months ago

    Daniel, Joseph, and Diego,
    It was great to read your blog post and learn about the research you have done focused on ocean conservation. I love the animated graphic that you included. It really helped bring your argument to life in a visually compelling way. You also have a good combination of sources to back up your argument. Your focus on Nestle moving away from single use plastic in it’s packaging seems like an important target that could make a real difference. I hope that you will consider reaching out to Nestle and sharing your thoughts with them. I also really love your idea of petitioning to give all students at Life Academy water bottles so that students in your own school community are helping with this issue. Since I imagine the cost may be high, do you have any suggestions of how the students or school might fundraise for such an expense? Offering these types of suggestions may help them consider how to put such a step into action. Best of luck with your efforts!

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