Recently in Current Events, we’ve been studying Weeksville Heritage Center At first, I knew what my teacher was talking about because I’ve gone to school around the corner from there and my aunt lives down the block. When I saw the video I started to think about the time when I first seen this place start being built. I know that many people feel that Weeksville is just some project housing place where people live. After doing this study, Think this is really an informational topic, for example, I can learn about how Weeksville was founded and how it has changed since then.

One thing that I know for sure about Weeksville is that Weeksville was founded by James Weeks Now I’ve studied my share of videos and articles, and personally, it’s to me how many people don’t know about the history of this place.

I did some research on Weeksville. I read “The Inspiring Story of Weeksville, One of America’s First Free Black Communities.” This article provided a lot of information. The writer was talking about how Weeksville was founded and it gave the backstory on the town. The backstory on the town didn’t really surprise me all that much, but it did make me think about how black people really motivated themselves to start their own community. It said that after slavery Henry C. Thompson bought land and started to black people which created the community.

In another source that I looked at, New Center, but Woes at Historic Site,” there was this one statement that made me think which was that Weeksville was home to 700 families and I didn’t think that Weeksville was that advanced it made think how the writer knew this. “The story of how the free black community was treated foreshadowed the ways all blacks were treated after slavery,” I feel this town made a statement for black people like we can achieve something or do something after slavery.

All of this makes me think that we all as black can come together and make a change and prove that we not all about killing each other.

 

Tags:

CC BY-SA 4.0 A Free Black Community by Nasay is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

7 Comments
  1. Pamela 1 week ago

    Dear Nasay,
    I agree with your post about Weeksville, It is very informational and know feel like i have a better understanding about what Weeksville used to be the the idea of a ” free black community”. I like how you connected what happened in Weeksville to slavery and other racist acts towards black people from the past.

  2. Jazmine 2 weeks ago

    Dear Nasay, I completely agree with you when you said that black people need to come together and make a change in order to be a successful team.

  3. Shantell 2 weeks ago

    Dear Nasay, I’m impressed with your post it taught me more on the topic. And since your Aunt lives in a Community not too far have you ever visited before? But I 100% agree with you when you said “All of this makes me think that we all as black people can come together and make a change and prove that we’re not all about killing each other”.

  4. Joshua 3 weeks ago

    To Nasay: in your writing about Weeksville, why was you not surprised that the back story about the community was important? Also its a good thing that your aunt lives in the community not to far, plus ask your aunt if she ever thought about the history.

  5. Foday 3 weeks ago

    Im impressed about your post, ¨Free Black community¨ because it was informational. Given that we have wrote on the same topic, I learned more on the topic. on sentence that spoke out to me was Weeksvilles being home to 700 families. I think this is very informative because there was a lot of key details. Another sentence that I strongly agree with was your concluding sentence because we can make a change and prove that we are not just wild animals, we are on the same standards as other races. This stood out because we talked about many topics and I can relate. Your post reminds me of the recent topics we used to go over in class. With slavery, protests etc. Thanks for you writing. I look forward to seeing what you wrote because you have thoughtful ideas and I would like to learn more from you.
    sincerly, Foday

  6. Shaquala 3 weeks ago

    Dear Nasay,
    I am impressed about your post, ¨Free Black community¨ because it was informational. Given that we have wrote on the same topic, I learned more on the topic. on sentence that spoke out to me was Weeksvilles being home to 700 families. I think this is very informative because there was a lot of key details. Another sentence that I strongly agree with was your concluding sentence because we can make a change and prove that we are not just wild animals, we are on the same standards as other races. This stood out because we talked about many topics and I can relate. Your post reminds me of the recent topics we used to go over in class. With slavery, protests etc. Thanks for you writing. I look forward to seeing what you wrote because you have thoughtful ideas and I would like to learn more from you.
    sincerly, Shaquala

  7. Lona 3 weeks ago

    Hi Nasay,

    I really enjoyed reading your post about Weeksville and appreciate the personal connection you shared.

    Like you, I too was inspired by how much this community of free Blacks was able to accomplish in the period just following slavery. What thoughts do you have about sharing the story with others–your peers, family teachers etc? How can you use the Weeksville story to inspire others to make a change in their communities?

    Thanks again for your post. I look forward to reading more of your posts on Youth Voices.

    Sincerely,

    Ms. Lona

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

CONTACT US

We welcome new members. You can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

Youth Voices is organized by teachers at local sites of the National Writing Project and in partnership with Educator Innovator.

CC BY-SA 4.0All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Missions on Youth Voices

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account

%d bloggers like this: