It is more common to find people on their phones looking at social apps, playing games, or texting rather than communicating to others face to face. Today’s generation find it difficult to talk to people because it can get “awkward” and it is easier to be on a device rather than a phone. As technology keeps advancing, will it cause people to be less creative? Technology is created to make situations easier, but have we gone to a point where we rely on technology too much that it actually hurts society rather than help.

In a recent article I read called “Is Technology Killing Creativity”, it states that “The predominance of technology and smartphones in particular has lead to many suggestions that creativity is being killed by our reliance on these tools.” Many people rely on these technologies daily, however technology has been present for a while now. In the 1990s, many people thought TV and computer games, will affect creativity, but people are still creating things.

In the Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Huxley believed that there was going to be a future where technology is used by human for a constant desire of distraction. Every time we find ourselves bored, it is more easier to pull out a device than to innovate and find something else to do. In addition, it is easy to find anything online somewhere, “we don’t give ourselves room to problem-solve and innovate on our own room.” If a situation becomes to difficult, it is easier to search for answer online than trying to figure it out. Scientific study tells us that we need time to daydream as daydream boosts our creativity. If we use any downtime to just scroll through our phone, than creativity can be lost. Newsweek reported on the findings of a recent study that indicated that while intelligence scores have steadily risen, creativity scores have been declining since 1990. This decline of creativity is thought to be in part to the decline in play.

There has been decades of theory and research in child development that tells us how the brain works for a child and how much of an impact their primary years are. It is important for children to play and engage in the “real world” by being active. Kids learn to be creative through direct play and hands-on experience with materials, people, and in nature, “kids need first-hand engagement — they need to manipulate objects physically, engage all their senses, and move and interact with the 3-dimensional world.” With these first hand engagement, it maximizes their learning and brain development. However, with screens being a distractor, it takes away from their creativity and more kids playing less than the previous generation.

It is not mention often, but play has a huge role in imagination. “Play is a remarkably creative process that fosters emotional health, imagination, original thinking, problem solving, critical thinking, and self-regulation.” Through playing, kids are able to create their own scenario, work through difficult times, built self confidence and feel a sense of mastery. If they play with materials, they are learning to understand concepts and skills that are the principles for later academic learning. By learning how to play, they are also learning how to learn such as asking question, creating and solving their own problems and taking initiative. Some examples of kids using materials to build creativity is using blocks, playdough, markers/colors, paint, sand and water. It is proven by neuroscientist that if children play this way, they are able to activate pathways and connection in their brain.

Although technology is beneficial and useful for kids, what children see and interact on the screen is not the same as the full experience for kids interacting in the real world with people and things. It may seem like these education app for children will assist their education, but it does not grasp the underlying concept of learning.

Here’s a link to my hypothesis annotation.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Is Technology limiting Creativity Pt.1 by Christopher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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5 Comments
  1. Mariah 2 months ago

    Christopher, I agree that technology has an impact on the ability of kids to find a creative outlet. However, I don’t think that it is necessarily leading to a less creative society. Technology allows many people to find access to more resources that allow them to grow in creativity. I think that we as a society need to prioritize how much time we spend on electronics. When used too much, it hinders our ability to experience boredom and therefore have our own creative enlightenment. Here is an article that I think best describes an alternative viewpoint (https://www.forbes.com/sites/gregsatell/2014/01/27/how-technology-enhances-creativity/#5f7ce42c3f50).

  2. kimuj 6 months ago

    are you stupid or what like are you kidding with me what are you even talking about this is all non sense

  3. kimuj 6 months ago

    oallalalalalallaalla i am totally not on your side

  4. dania 6 months ago

    i really like zis

  5. Ainsley 7 months ago

    Christopher,
    I agree with you. Technology can be extremely beneficial, but it doesn’t belong in the hands of little children. The first Iphone came out when I was seven, so most of my childhood was spent making games without technology. Before I was 5 we didn’t even have a TV. My friends and I got really good at making up new games and discovering ways to entertain ourselves. I don’t remember ever being bored. The only thing I disagree with you on is that technology isn’t just affecting children’s imagination, it affects all of us. I have found myself drifting towards my phone instead of the blank art canvas. I make excuses for why I should be allowed to let myself spend so much time with technology. Do you see yourself doing the same thing?

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