Globally animal mistreatment is prevalent and overlooked, especially in the farming industry. Factory farms designed to draw maximum output from animals put farm animals through unmistakably horrible treatments and hold them in brutal living spaces. Animals are put through these conditions all in the name of profit for factory owners seeking the highest possible profits with little to no regard for the wellbeing of their animals. Despite the reality of factory farms, the majority of people are unaware of the extent of animal cruelty going into the food that we eat.

 

According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals, “94% of Americans would agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion farm animals raised each year in the U.S. suffer in conditions that consumers would not accept if they could see them.” This shows how broad the consensus is that animals deserve humane treatment, yet factory farms still hold the majority of the nation’s farm animals. It’s hard to understand the kind of treatment factory farms provide without seeing a video or some pictures, but it’s appalling. The Last Chance for Animals organization states that “Farmers cut costs by feeding animals the remains of other animals, keeping them in extremely small and soiled enclosures, and refusing to provide bedding”. This is only a small glimpse at the things that go on within factory farming operations.

So that leaves the question: what can we do as consumers? As consumers we can watch our labels carefully and buy our food from trustworthy sources. Labels can be deceptive, this page from the ASPCA provides some aid in determining how to shop conscientiously. Consumers can help support organizations and foundations that help prevent animal cruelty and advocate humane treatment of animals, such as PETA, the ASPCA, and the Humane Society. Additionally spreading awareness of the reality of factory farms and all that’s involved with them can make a large difference towards people’s feelings towards the food that they eat.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Do You Really Know Where Your Food Comes From? by Ed is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

2 Comments
  1. Stephanie 6 months ago

    Dear Ed, I am shocked by your post, “Do You Really Know Where Your Food Comes From?” because Factory Farms are unfair to the animals. i’ve heard about Factory Farms, but i didn’t know it was this bad.

    One sentence you wrote that stands out for me is: “Animals are put through these conditions all in the name of profit for factory owners seeking the highest possible profits with little to no regard for the wellbeing of their animals.” I think this is horrifying because the people who own the “farms” are cruel and have no humanity. On the other hand, I wonder what is my role in this cruelty as someone who eats meat.

    Another sentence that stood out is: According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals, “94% of Americans would agree that animals raised for food deserve to live free from abuse and cruelty. Yet the majority of the nearly 10 billion farm animals raised each year in the U.S. suffer in conditions that consumers would not accept if they could see them.” I like this quote because if we don’t treat animals respectfully through small farms that value life, it won’t last because of the bad quality and people want good quality food. I believe people want their money to be worth what they are paying for: to be good for their health and that their money doesn’t support cruelty.

    Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next because this post sends a message about seeing whats really happening to animals being abuse.

  2. Johan 6 months ago

    Good Job Ed! I liked how you linked multiple sources in your post. You did a really good job at describing the problem and telling the reader how they can help solve it. I look forward to seeing more posts like this in the future.

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