I was at Hostos Community College when a professor at the college, Ms. Katherine Boehm gave my New Media Arts peers a tour around the college. While on the tour, a student named Matthew Benvenutti who was apart of the tour with me was recording and gave me an idea. Rather than just stopping someone in the middle of the street, why not ask a common person involved with the college who has a task on their hands about stress, anxiety, and depression. So time flew by and midway in the tour, I was observing people and checking to see who I should interview when I ran into these two young men who were students at the college the college.

I first stopped them in the most polite way possible and asked if I could talk to them for a few minutes. They said, “Sure.” Then I went on to say my name and that I have a video project for my New Media Arts class about Depression, Anxiety, and Stress. After that, I asked if they would be willing to do an interview, and they seemed to like the idea and decided to do it. Their names were Hanzel and Adrian. The interview overall was great, but there were a few key ideas that really stuck out to me.

One quote that Adrian said was:

“When I think of depression I-I feel like it’s- it’s a state of mind it’s a state of being, right. So sometimes I know like one of my friends he goes through depression and sometimes he wakes up and he says he feels perfectly fine; he’s just, the energy is not there. The day doesn’t work for him.”

This quote really stuck out because it goes to show that we are all people. We all have issues, and we have to get through them. Your mind might not be in the same place, but then again it is YOUR mind. You have to find a way to control it. Some days may be tougher than others, but you will somehow find a way to get through it.

Another quote that stood out to me–said by Hanzel this time around–was:

“Stress is something that everyone has to deal with because if you think about inanimate objects, even they deal with stress. Stress is basically an overload of something; like if something is too heavy for an object it’s going to break. So say like you’re compiling work on top of each other like, you keep putting more work on top of something that’s basically your form of stress.”

This quote actually stood out the most because he was actually very accurate or on point with the topic. He knew that stress is basically a load in your mind that can cause you to overthink.

And last but not least, the final quote by Hanzel was:

“So the more that someone has to deal with, that reflects how much stress they are having to hold up. So stress is a big component of; is it depression? Is that the question? Is stress a big component of depression? [Yeah] Yeah, so stress is definitely your component of depression because it exhausts you and when you are getting exhausted you slow down.”

This quote was actually the tip of the iceberg because it shows how both stress and depression tie in with each other and still cause you to overthink more than you’re actually supposed to.

CC BY-SA 4.0 Stress, Depressed, but Impressed by Samson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

1 Comment
  1. Claire 4 months ago

    Samson,

    This Arts Media project sounds interesting. Have you done any more research to see how depression and stress are connected? This could add valuable information to your piece. Also, explain more of how these students deal with the stress and depression. Great job.

Leave a Reply

CONTACT US

We welcome new members. You can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

Youth Voices is organized by teachers at local sites of the National Writing Project and in partnership with Educator Innovator.

CC BY-SA 4.0All work on Youth Voices is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
Missions on Youth Voices

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account

%d bloggers like this: