Everywhere you turn, you can see someone complaining about how lazy today’s young people are, how we were handed everything and don’t know how to work a “real job”. My question is, is this true? Are today’s younger generations getting lazier and lazier? Are we falling into Aldous Huxley’s society of ignorance and indolence?

On Psychology Today, Neel Burton M.D. says a person is lazy if “he is able to carry out some activity that he ought to carry out, but is disinclined to do so because of the effort involved. Instead, he carries out the activity perfunctorily; or engages in some other, less strenuous or less boring activity; or remains idle. In short, he is being lazy if his motivation to spare himself effort trumps his motivation to do the right or expected thing”. So, does this define millennials? Are we idle, lacking motivation? Sure we were the first generation to grow up with smartphones and experience constant leaps and bounds in the world of technology, but does that mean we are the Huxlian generation?

The Boston Globe doesn’t think so. In fact, “workplace experts say workaholics are common among 19-to-35-year-olds, perhaps more so than among older members of Generation X and baby boomers”. The majority work 50 hour weeks and experience guilt if they ever take time off. Their minds are “always on” as many of their childhoods were filled with sports, extracurriculars, demanding school work and test course, all in order to get into college. They grew up in a hyper competitive world and now face enormous student loan debts. Bob Kelleher calls millennials a “driven generation”.

So, does this sound like laziness to you? It sure doesn’t to me. I believe we are safe from Huxley’s prediction with the hard and dedicated work of this generation. It’s up to the future generations to keep this ball rolling.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Lazy! by Zoe is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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4 Comments
  1. Ruotong L. 5 months ago

    Dear Zoe,
    I am intrigued by your post because it describes laziness in a different way and its exact definition. A normal person would probably say that being lazy is not bothering to do anything. One thing you said that stands out for me is: “he is able to carry out some activity that he ought to carry out, but is disinclined to do so because of the effort involved. Instead, he carries out the activity perfunctorily; or engages in some other, less strenuous or less boring activity; or remains idle” I think this is interesting because if people thought this way, than doing what they think they are too lazy to do will mean that they are doing something they should which can motivate them to do it more.
    Your post reminds me of something that happened to me. One time my dad said that we should go to the meusum, but I did not feel like doing so. Then, later, I decided that I might as well not be lazy and just g, so I went wih my dad. This shows that thinking that you are being lazy may help with not being lazy. Thanks for your project. I look forward to seeing what you write next because your passage was interesting and gives people a new perspective of seeing things.

  2. Luis 8 months ago

    Dear Zoe

    I like your thoughts on this subject because it had great statements and also evidence backing it up. One sentence that you wrote that stands out to me is “their minds are “always on” as many of their childhoods were filled with sports, extracurriculars, demanding school work and test course, all in order to get into college. They grew up in a hyper competitive world and now face enormous student loan debts”. This stood out to me because it was pretty funny how you made fun of the school system. Also I am about to face with student loans so it is pretty depressing. Thanks for your writing. I look forward to seeing what you write next, because I learned about a different point of view. Which is always good.

  3. Logan 9 months ago

    Zoe, I agree that perhaps young people are overly criticized of being lazy. I think that activity involving technology has become defined as lazy; it is a stigmatism. As a generation, i think that we are actually the least lazy. The vast majority of students are involved in a plethora of activities, both in and out of school. We are bombarded with homework every day, and are expected to maintain both academic and social lives. College has become far more competitive, so we are forced to work harder than previous generations to get in. Once we graduate, we have to work incredibly hard to maintain a comfortable life, as the cost of living has skyrocketed but the average income has stagnated. Ultimately, I think that our generation might actually be the least lazy of all. I’ll look forward to hearing more!

    -Logan

  4. Judge Thomas 9 months ago

    Zoe,
    I agree that the discussion of laziness in our communities is widely discussed today. On the other hand, I agree that the competitiveness of our generation exemplifies a major aspect that keeps progress on the roll. Even though our generation can express outward attributes of being lazy or being constantly addicted to our mobile devices, we, nonetheless, carry feelings for change toward world progress that makes me feel very optimistic about the future. Throughout the years during my high school career, I have noticed how many of our classmates have fundamental beliefs that inspire others, especially inspiring me, to become the better human being for humanity. I truly believe that our generation is not as lazy or blind as many would think we are. Thank you, Zoe, I appreciate our post.

    -Thomas K.

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