I believe as a society, we care about too many things in our life that should not matter or affect our daily lives. We care too much about celebrities and sports, buying nice things, and impressing people. We think more about how other people perceive us than how we treat others or ourselves.

If you were to log onto any of your social media accounts, the first thing you’ll probably see is news on a celebrity or a pro athlete. The post would probably be talking about who they are dating, how they played in their last game, or even any trouble they have gotten themselves into. But is this any of our business? Should we be concerned about other people’s lives, even if it is broadcasted in the media? 

Another thing you will see on your social media are adds to buy nice things, or celebrities getting paid to advertise for a company. Why do we think we need what everyone else has? Why do you need to get the newest thing as soon as it comes out? Why do we feel the need to always impress people?

Huffington Post said it is our need for approval that has been conditioned in us from the day we were born, “we’re convinced that [our] recognition matters to our self worth and how deeply we value ourselves.” The article went on to say that we have things in our lives that effect the way we live without us even knowing; things like what we do or do not do, what we say or don’t, the things we buy, etc. In today’s world, it would benefit everyone if we stopped every once and while and asked ourselves why we were doing something and if it really matters.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Are we too caught up in the trivial things in life? by Olivia is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

4 Comments
  1. Reagan 7 months ago

    Olivia Sauer!
    I agree that the norm in today’s society is to flaunt what you have no matter how minimal while others are left in awe. You brought up some great points like asking why it even matter’s and why are you doing this, and it has really made me think. Why do I need to show off on snapchat or on instagram that I am out having a good time? Has that really become the social norm? While I was thinking about this questions, I came across a website that has great information to look more into this topic if you are interested! https://www.huffingtonpost.com/marianna-glynska/are-you-hooked-the-impact_b_6872962.html

  2. Caleigh 7 months ago

    Olivia,
    I really enjoyed your post, and I feel that this is very interesting and relevant to our society today. We are caught up in the materialistic part of our world, and too concerned with other peoples lives instead of our own. I like how you asked questions like “Why do we think we need what everyone else has? Why do you need to get the newest thing as soon as it comes out? Why do we feel the need to always impress people?” because I feel this is very true. And I feel it is very visable in my own life today, I am very involved in other peoples lives, and or seeing what do items are coming out this month. And I remember being in Thailand, where people care more about themselves, and don’t care what is coming out. It was very visible how happy they were, and so I am wondering if you think that if you are very involved in a materialistic world, if you are less likely to be happy. I loved your post, and I’m excited to read more!

  3. Eric 7 months ago

    Olivia,
    Your claim in the first paragraph is very interesting, and I would like to examine some other sides to what you said: “We think more about how other people perceive us than how we treat others or ourselves”. Firstly, how people perceive us is, at least in part, affected by how we treat other people. Of course, that can be positive or negative, depending on who you associate with, but the only way to not care about interacting with other people would be to live as a self-sufficient hermit somewhere very far removed from civilization. Second, I would argue that in modern times it is harder to not take care of yourself than it is to take care of yourself. The advertisements that you noticed are an interesting example of social media pushing people to “take care” of themselves – which you noted in your analysis of the Huffington Post’s article.

    I think your observation at the end – that the world would be a bit better if everyone considered their actions a bit more – is remarkable. Reading http://bigthink.com/think-tank/slow-down-you-think-too-fast may interest you. It examines a bit of how people make decisions, the effect part of the advertising industry that many people don’t or refuse to recognize.

  4. Averi 7 months ago

    Hey!
    I like your last statement, in the third paragraph. “Why am I doing this? And does it matter?” This question has probably ran through thoughts of my own. When I am partaking in certain actions, or deciding between two things this has actually been a useful tactic I’ve used to analyze the “why’s” and “so’s” and “because” in my life.
    I think more people could ask themselves these self evaluating questions to determine what’s important to them, rather than getting blinded my shallow, mediocre activities- or people.

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