Is it possible to be happy alone? I don’t mean alone in the sense of single or without family, I mean alone without human contact. Everyday we make hundreds of connections with others, and they bring us different emotions. Often times we walk into a conversation in a horrible mood, and we leave feeling happy, other times human interaction brings us down. I wanted to know if it is possible for us to find long term happiness in things outside of our relationships with others.

Clearly as people we find joy in many things, but when it comes down to it, the majority of it comes from connections we make with other people. Feelings of sadness often come from connections with others, and lack of connection with others. After looking on the UCLA Newsroom, I found that connections are more than what we want, they are what we need.  “‘Being socially connected is our brain’s lifelong passion,’ said Lieberman, a professor of psychology in the UCLA College of Letters and Science and a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral science at UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. ‘It’s been baked into our operating system for tens of millions of years.’”

Because of this, I don’t think it is possible to be happy and fulfilled without social connection. We need other people to bring the life into us. Our brain needs social connections to survive and thrive. Human contact is the basis of who we are and what we do. Every part of our lives and our emotions depends on others, whether we want it to or not.

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CC BY-SA 4.0 Does Our Happiness Depend on Others? by Lindsay is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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9 Comments
  1. Paola 12 months ago

    I agree with you post but I feel relying a lot on other people to be happy can’t be a good thing all the time. Many of our relationships end at one point so if you rely on one person and they leave, what are you going to have?

  2. Kai'Mana 12 months ago

    Lindsay,
    I am intrigued by your post because I find it interesting that individuals crave for social connection. As humans we naturally interact with society on a daily basis. As stated ” I found that connections are more than what we want, they are what we need. “‘Being socially connected is our brain’s lifelong passion.. ” This statement makes me think more in depth. Numerous people thrive to be socially connected, but not everyone is alike. We all have different thoughts, could this truly be how others feel? I believe that your post may apply to many, but not all.

  3. Samantha 12 months ago

    Dear Lindsay,
    I was very satisfied with this post because of the way you expressed your thoughts about the happiness one can bring to a person. I myself once believed that you shouldn’t depend on others for your happiness because I believe that your own love to yourself can make you very happy as well and I still agree with this because self love is very important. One thing you said that really stood out to me is, “Everyday we make hundreds of connections with others, and they bring us different emotions.” this really opened my mind to a new idea because I myself become joyful by the laughter or affection of somebody else it doesn’t have to your significant other but it can be your parents or your siblings or even a friend because its these type of people that bring joy into peoples lives. Thank you for sharing your post I really enjoyed reading this.

  4. Emily 12 months ago

    Dear Lindsay,
    When I first read the headline of your post, it instantly intrigued me. The points you made in this post were excellent and defended the point you tried to make well. One thing that you said that was interesting me was: “Often times we walk into a conversation in a horrible mood, and we leave feeling happy, other times human interaction brings us down.” because as a social species, our interactions with other effected our emotions since the time we first appeared on this earth.
    Regards,
    Emily

  5. Kaitlyn 12 months ago

    Dear Lindsay,
    I am satisfied with the points and argument made in this post, because of the standpoint you took it from. What I mean by this is how you used evidence to support your hypothesis from a high standard resource. Many people often have a claim and nothing to back up their statement leaving it to be irrelevant to others, because all it is is an opinion. However, I’m not fully convinced/believe what is being said, because everyone is very different from one another.
    A quote that really stood out to me was, ” I don’t think it is possible to be happy and fulfilled without social connection. We need other people to bring the life into us. Our brain needs social connections to survive and thrive.” This brought attention to my eyes because, not everyone wants to be social, they are more secluded and independent. You do not have to have social connections to bring happiness into your life if that isn’t the type of person you are.

  6. Angelica 1 year ago

    “Is it possible to be happy alone?” Yes, it is possible for humans to find happiness in their own company. I agree with you that being with people we connect to helps us become who we are today. Humans are capable living without any human contact, but there are consequences when severing these ties. In the article https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2017/why-too-much-solitude-can-be-bad-for-you.html, people become depressed when there’s no one to connect to. I believe our own loneliness causes us to talk to ourselves when no one is around. Do you think our need to express ourselves causes us to talk to ourselves? There are also emotions that humans don’t want to feel alone, like lose of a loved one, trauma, and less than. These connections make us feel important, and I think that’s why humans crave socializing when lonely. Do you think if smartphones didn’t exist, children would be more happy? I’d like to come back and hear more about what you have to say about this topic. If you continue it.

  7. Sebastian 1 year ago

    Lindsay,
    I saw your headline and knew immediately I would be interested in this topic. You keep the reader interested with varying of sentences and syntax of referring to information from professors. Truly, I was under the impression one can survive and do well alone. This absolutely changes my opinion on the matter because of all the information you offered. You made a great point when you reference emotions having a large impact “whether we want to, or not.” Great job with the interesting question and more than satisfactory answer.

  8. Sophie 1 year ago

    Lindsay,
    I found this post really interesting, because I never really thought about the topic of human connection being something that our happiness depends on. I believe that humans and all animals need communication with others to survive, and it is rooted in us at a young age. By being close to our mothers ever since we are born, we learn to feel human connection, and how beneficial it is. If a child is not held or comforted or communicated with by their mother or anyone around them, that child may grow up with learning deficiencies, psychotic disorders, and socio/psychopathic tendencies. The Harry Harlow experiment shows how communication and comfort is needed at such a young age and is ingrained into our instincts as we grow. https://www.psychologynoteshq.com/psychological-studies-harlows-monkey/
    Great post, and I hope to read more about this topic from you!

  9. Anna 1 year ago

    Lindsay,
    I found your question interesting. Humans are such social beings, that being in social isolation is something that we don’t really think about and doesn’t occur naturally easily. As you said, “Everyday we make hundreds of connections with others, and they bring us different emotions.” If you wanted to go deeper into this question, the I thought of the extreme cases that would be documented. A source (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/article/what-does-solitary-confinement-do-to-your-mind/) goes through solitary confinement and “In one study, he found that roughly a third of solitary inmates were “actively psychotic and/or acutely suicidal,”” and other side effects. With this information in mind, I agree with your conclusion that we need human contact and interactions at a rate in which our social skills don’t atrophy. If you do continue on this topic, I’d be very interested in reading more.

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