In chapter 6 of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Huck says, “I had been to school most all the time and could spell and read and write just a little, and could say the multiplication table up to six times seven is thirty-five, and I don’t reckon I could ever get any further than that if I was to live forever .”

This early on shows a theme of ignorance in the book. Huck Finn is set in the mid to late 1830s when education wasn’t as important to society as it is now. This is evident when Huckleberry says that he knows his multiplications up to 6×7. He’s very proud of this accomplishment and ironically he’s incorrect. This shows how little importance the people in the younger generation put on education because the jobs at the time didn’t require that much education.

 

Throughout the adventures Jim has shown a sense of gullibility and superstition. “He said it would fetch bad luck; and besides, he said, he might come and ha’nt us; he said a man that warn’t buried was more likely to go a-ha’nting around than one that was planted and comfortable”.

This is one more way Twain pokes fun of people in this time period. Throughout the story Huck and Jim encounter people in all towns and their willingness to believe their every word plays into all the plot points. Jim is introduced as a very superstitious person, had his opinions on snake skins just furthers this point.

CC BY-SA 4.0 Huckleberry Finn Dialectic Journal by Sejal is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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