Chapter 17
In this Chapter Huck spends a while explaining Emmeline Grangerford’s paintings, poems, and room.

I think that the way he describes what Emmelines creations makes them seem extremely dark and sad. This shows us insight to the Grangerford family and how to Huck they seemed like a good family, minus the feud he didn’t understand, but not everything was as it seemed and the kids, at least Emmeline were not happy. He also is amazed with her poem and how she only wrote it when she was 13, he the continues to ponder on how Emmeline could have become an amazing writer. The combination of these two parts of the chapter really bring out little details in this family and how their feud is more harm than good. It shows how it’s hurting people, but it also shows that it’s taking lives that could have became something great.

CC BY-SA 4.0 Huckleberry Finn Dialectic Journal by Hadley is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

4 Comments
  1. Jordan 4 months ago

    Hadley,
    I also found this part intriguing! I think Huck made a real connection with this deceased child and I think that shows a lot about his character. He doesn’t care about who people are, just what they have to say. I also couldn’t help but think of how Twain had to become a different author in this section! I rarely think about how an author has to change tones for each character, but when he actually had to write something for another character, it stood out much more.

  2. Lauryn 4 months ago

    Hi Hadley,
    I agree the Grangerford’s are good people but they are living a very messed up life.They are in this feud which has no reason what so ever but they are very good people to Huck. I think that this topic should really be looked at because the Grangerford’s have two different sides to them a very nice side and an evil side.

  3. Eric 4 months ago

    I agree with Evan, Huck definitely thinks of the Grangerfords as good people, but what I question is how they, as well as Huck, threat the slaves. Huck doesn’t even mention their names, or how much work they actually did. I think there is much more to address with the feud, like maybe looking at it like a symbol for every conflict? Every conflict does much more harm than good, but the people involved all think they are right and it is good.

  4. Evan 4 months ago

    I completely agree with you that Huck’s perception of the Grangerfords is that they are good people but a bit twisted. I appreciate that you spoke about the fact that the Grangerfords actions are both helpful and hurtful. I would look into what characters like their slaves or Jim thought of them as Huck is an unreliable narrator.

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