Through using the Pioneer Research Database, I was able to uncover lots of new information regarding animal testing. Animal testing has, in the last few years, become increasingly unpopular. According to the Pew Research Center, the majority of Americans now oppose the use of animal testing. Even more promising, “the number of North American medical schools using living animals to teach students has dropped from 187 to 4” (Past, Present, and Future). Many industries are proving that moving to non animal technologies to help us understand human conditions is extremely effective. Helen Marston, the head of Humane Research Australia, argues that “humans differ from other animals anatomically, genetically, and metabolically, meaning data derived from animals cannot be extrapolated to humans with sufficient accuracy” (New Internationalist). This argument is an extremely logical one. Humans are a species that are incredibly complex, and their systems cannot be entirely replicated in any other living species. Pre-clinical testing should instead be done in a way that eliminated the risk of species differences, and is instead directly applicable to humans. On this front, there has been many new revolutionary strides made in the past 10 years. One agency that has always been at the forefront of this new technology is the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS). They have recently developed a “Tox21 high-speed robot screening system that works around the clock to effectively predict-without using animals- how chemicals will affect human health and the environment” (Good Medicine). Advancements and new technologies such as these will soon make testing on animals not only the less effective and safe option, but an obsolete one.

Sources:

PYCROFT, LAURIE and HELEN MARSTON. “Is Animal Testing Necessary to Advance Medical Research?.” New Internationalist, no. 444, July 2011, p. 34. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tth&AN=62091081&site=ehost-live.

“Stem Cells and Robotics Speed Transition from Animal Testing.” Good Medicine, vol. 26, no. 1, Winter2017, p. 16. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tth&AN=120757705&site=ehost-live.

 

“Past, Present, Future.” Good Medicine, vol. 24, no. 2, Spring 2015, p. 6. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=tth&AN=102995748&site=ehost-live.

CC BY-SA 4.0 Problems With Animal Testing by Mae is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

8 Comments
  1. Kenzie 5 months ago

    I thought this was pretty cool and I think it is good that they are moving away from animal testing.

  2. Tyrah 5 months ago

    Dear Mae, I am happy you wrote this post. It shoes just how bad animal cruelty is because a lot of people really dont know how animals are being used to test products that will hurt or kill them.

  3. Kevin 6 months ago

    Dear Mae,
    I did not think that animal cruelty was this bad. I’m glad you shared all this information because we need to stop killing and abusing animals. I think it is really cruel to be doing this to so many different kinds of animals. But I think some people would need to kill some animals because they might benefit from getting food or to make products. But, some people just abuse and kill animals and don’t even care about them.

  4. Jerremy 6 months ago

    This is interesting because a lot of companies use animals to test their products.

  5. Pavan 6 months ago

    This is interesting and all, but how long do you think it would take for such a system to be implemented. The thing about using animals is that, although the Tox21 can predict the outcome, that itself is the problem. While testing on lab rats (or any lab animal), we get to see some of the side effects since we have an idea on how it may affect us, since most of the things that kill rats can probably kill humans. Also, buying animals is cheaper for the labs, whereas the Tox21 is limited with how many calculations it can do at once. Even if we give it the benefit of the doubt, there’d be accessibility issues.

  6. Vail 6 months ago

    Very pleased to see these new technologies replacing animal testing!

  7. Sonia 6 months ago

    Dear Mae,
    I am excited about the promise our future holds because of your argumentative post, “Problems With Animal Testing,” because I wholly oppose animal cruelty, and in fact hope to become a chemist that researches alternatives to animal testing in the future. This was what attracted me to your post initially: I love reading anything about the unjustness of today’s world so that I can dispute it, but I also love reading about how the world is changing for the better and how a light is shining somewhere on these animals suffering from ruthless torment!
    One sentence that stands out for me is, “Helen Marston, the head of Humane Research Australia, argues that ‘humans differ from other animals anatomically, genetically, and metabolically, meaning data derived from animals cannot be extrapolated to humans with sufficient accuracy’ (New Internationalist).” I feel inspired by this quote, and I cannot agree with it more! Why are we torturing animals so much if the results won’t be completely accurate? When there are alternatives out there that directly help humans?
    Another sentence that I was intrigued by was, “Even more promising, ‘the number of North American medical schools using living animals to teach students has dropped from 187 to 4’ (Past, Present, and Future).” The world is changing, and there’s no denying it! I had no idea that the numbers would be so drastic, but I am glad they are. Who knows, perhaps in a few years that 4 will drop to a 0!
    Thank you very much for writing this; it has made my day! I look forward to what you’re going to write next because topics of such importance interest me greatly.

  8. Aarush 6 months ago

    This will be very helpful for us as finding this information can be significant

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