For those who immigrate to the U.S., migration is tedious and expensive. Nearly all undocumented immigrants have no method of entering the U.S. legally due to restrictions on green cards and a lack of availability of visas. Many have debated in favor of increasing enforcement of laws governing illegal immigration, calling for building a barrier along the 2,000-mile U.S. Mexico border or creating a new guest worker program.

The United States Department of Homeland Security has estimated that 11.4 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the United States in January 2012. In 2012, 52% were from Mexico, 15% from Central America, 12% from Asia, 6% from South America, 5% from the Caribbean, and another 5% from Europe and Canada. The number of immigrants that cross the border illegally each year are not directly

The United States Department of Homeland Security has estimated that 11.4 million unauthorized immigrants lived in the United States in January 2012. In 2012, 52% were from Mexico, 15% from Central America, 12% from Asia, 6% from South America, 5% from the Caribbean, and another 5% from Europe and Canada. The number of immigrants that cross the border illegally each year are not directly countable, and are estimated from the number who are caught trying.

For 2015, the DHS reported 337,117 apprehensions. Using an estimated catch rate of 33%, the number crossing without detection would be 674,000 per year. The rate of new illegal immigrants, combining both sources is 1,201,000 in 2015. From 2005 to 2009, the number of people entering the U.S. illegally declined by nearly 67%, according to the Pew Hispanic Center, from 850,000 yearly average in the early 2000s to 300,000. 2015 DHS data indicates that the decline was a temporary phenomenon, and illegal immigration is climbed back to near-record levels.

The 2015 yearly rate of over 1 million also necessitates revising previous estimates of total illegal immigrant population, which by end of 2016 could be expected to reach 13 million. The dean of the College of Public Policy of the University of Texas at San Antonio, Rogelio Saenz, states that lower birth rates and the growing economy in Mexico slowed emigration, creating more jobs for Mexicans. Saenz also states that Mexican immigrants are no longer coming to find jobs but to flee from violence, noting that the majority of those escaping crime “are far more likely to be naturalized U.S. citizens”.

Sources: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/09/20/5-facts-about-illegal-immigration-in-the-u-s/
https://www.dhs.gov

CC BY-SA 4.0 U.S. Illegal Immigration by Zach is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

1 Comment
  1. Adrian 1 year ago

    Zach, these are very interesting significant stats. I do agree the immigration process is “very tedious and expensive” since I have seen it for myself. I work at an office and sometimes we work with immigration and it is a tedious long process and the fees are considerably high, especially when they have to renew their permits every couple years.

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