In Nigeria, it has been difficult for the government to determine exactly how many women are raped annually because it is such a large country and some cases have not been reported to the police. On the contrary, there have been studies done by universities in Nigeria looking at specific rape crimes to try and determine the number of women experiencing sexual harassment in Nigeria. For example, a study done by Mary O. Esere, Adeyemi I. Idowu, Irene A. Durosaro and Joshua A. Omotosho at University of Ilorin in Nigeria on “Intimate Partner Rape and Violence,” found that “principal causes of Intimate Partner Rape/Violence were unequal power relations; alcohol and drug dependence and jealousy” (Esere, Journal of AIDS and HIV Research: Causes and consequences of intimate partner rape and violence: Experiences of victims in Lagos, Nigeria ). Violence is something that Nigerian women become accustomed because of the governmental neglect of the domestic violence they’ve been experiencing.

The self -reported consequences of this rape crime included physical injury (31.87%) , constant headaches (27.27%), sleep disturbances (18.18%), excessive fear and anxiety (9.09%), suicidal ideation (9.09%), and hatred for men (4.55%).The society in which this women live in also has an influence on the judgement of rape in Nigeria; in this society, women are seen inferior to men and they should be subject to men. This is not the case for all of Nigeria, but it is a view held in many areas of the country and the broader African continent as well. The government has acted poorly in establishing harsh laws against rape, and even members of the Nigerian law department feel this way. For example, in Edo, the Attorney-General and Commissioner for Justice, Henry Idahagbon, cited the current laws in the state as insufficient in tackling the epidemic saying “as the law stands now, there are lots of loopholes for offenders to escape convictions.” On the other hand, the government is trying to come up with laws to amend the situation and laws already existing in order to reduce rape in Nigeria. Rape is still on the rise in Nigeria, and new cases are reported daily. In 2012, Lagos State reported that 427 children had been raped that year, but there were more cases that were not reported to the government ( Ebhuomhan, Inside Nigeria’s growing rape epidemic). The people of Nigeria have begun to say that the rapist committing these crimes are acting of anger and a want for power and this is because of the weak government in place.

http://www.acahttps://www.theguardian.com/global-development/poverty-matters/2014/mar/28/african-women-progress-equality-afrobarometer-report-2014
demicjournals.org/article/article1379405215_Esere%20et%20al.pdf

INVESTIGATION: Inside Nigeria’s growing rape epidemic


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CC BY-SA 4.0 The Alarming Increase of Rape In Nigeria by Lula is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

5 Comments
  1. Profile photo of Siena
    Siena 7 months ago

    Lula, the same thought that April brought up about the manipulation of the rapists through claiming they are trying to cry for reform came to me. I think that your piece is relevant and interesting because it strays from the beaten path of reports on rape culture in the United States. Your sources were also a good addition. Great work!

  2. Profile photo of Victoria
    Victoria 10 months ago

    There are definitely cultural characteristics that I think keeps women quiet, leaving many cases unreported. This is also an issue that is rampant all over the world, and can be seen in laws such as pardon through marriage in Morocco (which has fortunately been repealed) and the global sex trade. The next question, I think, is to see how this can be solved. It is definitely not going to be a simple solution, but I think is an issue that needs to be addressed.

  3. Profile photo of April
    April 10 months ago

    Dear Lula,
    I am interested in your post because women are not speaking up about the rapings that are occurring to them. I also believe the society in which these women live in also has an influence on the judgement of rape, because women are scared of speaking up for the fear of getting judged. One thing you said that stands out for me is “The people of Nigeria have begun to say that the rapist committing these crimes are acting of anger and a want for power and this is because of the weak government in place.” I think this is interesting because it seems as if the rapist are trying to manipulate the government by committing these horrible crimes against their women. Thanks for your project. I look forward to seeing what you write next, because I really thought this post was interesting.

  4. Profile photo of Paul
    Paul 10 months ago

    Lula —

    Check out the Go Fund Me https://www.gofundme.com/cu4cissn organized by Abby, the commenter just below me here. Their organization CU4C is raising money

    “to improve the sustainability of Bumpe, Sierra Leone, which is out first international partner school. The school in Bumpe had a lot of amenities and was a very integral part of the community until the rebel war (1991-2002) destroyed it. Now the school has a lack of electricity, technology, bathrooms, staff, and general resources. Their major concerns are girls not feeling motivated to continue schooling and the lack of sustainable electricity. Currently the school is running off of a diesel power generator which is very difficult and costly to use.The people of Bumpe have also large problem with early marriage and teen pregnancy and feel that education can help decrease this issue and better the lives of the women and girls in Bumpe. ‘Connected. United. 4 Change.’ wants to help our partners by raising money to provide solar panels to their school.”

    You two should talk!

  5. Profile photo of Abby
    Abby 10 months ago

    This rape epidemic is awful, no matter where it is. I hope soon people will learn to respect other people’s boundaries and other genders. This article is so important to spark a conversation about an often ignored topic.

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